Handbook of East Asian Psycholinguistics

A large body of knowledge has accumulated in recent years on the cognitive processes and brain mechanisms underlying language. Much of this knowledge has come from studies of Indo-European languages, in particular English. Chinese, spoken by one-fifth of the world's population, differs significantly from most Indo-European languages in its grammar, its lexicon, and its written and spoken forms -- features which have profound implications for the learning, representation, and processing of language.

Book Reviews: (1) Natsuko Tsujimura; (2) Zhu Hua; (3) Hyun-joo Song & Franklin Chang

Volume 1: Chinese

Volume 1: Chinese

Editors: Ping Li, Li Hai Tan, Elizabeth Bates, and Ovid Tzeng

Cambridge University Press (2006)

ISBN 10 0 521 83333 7 hardback
(ISBN 13 978 0 521 83333 2)

This handbook, the first in a three-volume set on East Asian psycholinguistics, presents a state-of-the-art discussion of the psycholinguistic study of Chinese. With contributions by over fifty leading scholars, it covers topics in first and second language acquisition, language processing and reading, language disorders in children and adults, and the relationships between language, brain, culture, and cognition. It will be invaluable to all scholars and students interested in the Chinese language, as well as cognitive psychologists, linguists, and neuroscientists.

See the Table of Contents.

    To obtain a copy:
  1. On-line: Amazon.com
  2. Order: Cambridge University Press's order page

Volume 2: Japanese

Volume 2: Japanese

Editors:Mineharu Nakayama, Reiko Mazuka, and Yasuhiro Shirai

Cambridge University Press (2006)

ISBN 10 0 521 83334 5 hardback
(ISBN 13 978 0 521 83334 9)

This handbook, the second in a three-volume series on East Asian psycholinguistics, presents a state-of-the-art discussion of the psycholinguistic study of Japanese. With contributions by over fifty leading scholars, it covers topics in first and second language acquisition, language processing and reading, language disorders in children and adults, and the relationships between language, brain, culture, and cognition. It will be invaluable to all scholars and students interested in the Japanese language, as well as cognitive psychologists, linguists, and neuroscientists.

See the Introduction chapter, index, and contributors information.

    To obtain a copy:
  1. On-line: Amazon.com (prices vary)
  2. Order: Cambridge University Press's order page

Volume 3: Korean

Volume 3: Korean

Editors: Chungmin Lee, Greg B. Simpson, and Youngjin Kim

Cambridge University Press (2006)

ISBN 97 8 052 18333 56

This handbook, the third in a three-volume series on East Asian psycholinguistics, presents a state-of-the-art discussion of the psycholinguistic study of Korean. With contributions by over fifty leading scholars, it covers topics in first and second language acquisition, language processing and reading, language disorders in children and adults, and the relationships between language, brain, culture, and cognition. It will be invaluable to all scholars and students interested in the Korean language, as well as cognitive psychologists, linguists, and neuroscientists.

See the Introduction chapter, index, and contributors information.

    To obtain a copy:
  1. On-line: Amazon.com (prices vary)
  2. Order: Cambridge University Press's order page