Doris Lee, Ph.D.
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Teaching

Dr. Lee's teaching has primarily involved graduate courses for part-time master's degree students. Dr. Lee has taught 8 different graduate courses. The topics of these courses include systematic instructional development, computer-based instruction design and development, an introduction of computers to educators, research in instructional systems, instructional systems analysis, learner and outcome analysis, school and educational systems design, and research colloquium. Dr. Lee was the receipt of the 2006-2007 and 2010-2011 Teaching Excellence Award at Great Valley.

Dr. Lee's current courses include:

INSYS 415: Systematic Instructional Development

Course Goal and Overview

INSYS 415 is designed to provide students with in-depth experience in using a systematic approach to instructional or training programs design. Students will learn design principles and processes that can be applied across any instructional delivery system.  Upon completion of the course, students will be able to describe the components of the Dick, Carey and Carey??s (2008) systematic model, their rationales and uses. In addition, students will be able to use this model in the design, development, and evaluation of an instructional or  training module.

Course Text

            Dick, w., & Carey, L., & Carey, J.  (2008). The systematic design of instruction. (7th ed.). Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Merrill.

            Additional materials provided by the instructor.

INSYS 471: Instructional Systems Analysis

Course Goal and Overview

INSYS 471 is designed to provide students with the knowledge and insights necessary to understand and examine: (1) Systems Theory? Characteristics and components of systems and values inherent in systems theory; (2) Educational Systems ?V The complexity inherent in American and other educational systems and how key components of a typical educational system interact with and affect the operation of other components; and (3) Issues and Possible Solutions in Education in the US ?V Important issues facing school districts, teachers, parents and students in the US and the possible solutions.

Suggested Course Text and Materials

?span style= "FONT: 7pt 'Times NewRoman'">         Rogers, E. (2003). Diffusion of innovations (5th Edition). New York, NY: The Free Press

?span style= "FONT: 7pt 'Times NewRoman'">         Ashwell, Andrew. Business Leadership: The Third Wave of Education Reform.

?span style= "FONT: 7pt 'Times NewRoman'">         Banathy, Bala. Systems Design of Education: A Journey to Create the Future.

?span style= "FONT: 7pt 'Times NewRoman'">         Banathy, Bala. A Systems View of Education: Concepts and Principles for Effective practice.

?span style= "FONT: 7pt 'Times NewRoman'">         Checkland, P. Systems Thinking, Systems Practice.

?span style= "FONT: 7pt 'Times NewRoman'">         Dormant, D. The ABCDs of Managing Change.

?span style= "FONT: 7pt 'Times NewRoman'">         Dormant, D. Implementing Human Performance Technology in Organizations.

?span style= "FONT: 7pt 'Times NewRoman'">         Ellsworth, James, B. Surviving Education: A Survey of Educational Change Models.

?span style= "FONT: 7pt 'Times NewRoman'">         Gibbony, Richard. The Stone Trumpet.

?span style= "FONT: 7pt 'Times NewRoman'">         Havelock, R.G., and Havelock, M.C. Training for Change Agents: A Guide to the Design of Training Programs in Education and Other Fields.

?span style= "FONT: 7pt 'Times NewRoman'">         Hutchins, Charles, L. (1996). Systemic thinking: Solving complex problems. Aurora, Colorado: Professional Development Systems.

?span style= "FONT: 7pt 'Times NewRoman'">         Oshry, B. (1995). Seeing Systems: Unlocking the mysteries of organizational life. Berrett-Koehler; ISBN 1881052737.

?span style= "FONT: 7pt 'Times NewRoman'">         Reigeluth, Charles, M. (1994). Systemic Change in Education.

 

INSYS 521: Instructional Systems Analysis

Course Goal and Overview

INSYS 521 is designed to provide students with in-depth knowledge and experience concerning needs and task analysis.  Students will learn theories, models, and skills for conducting needs and task analysis.  Specifically, students will improve their needs analysis skills by (1) determining the appropriate needs analysis theories and models and data gathering techniques, (2) gathering data through at least two different techniques, and (3) analyzing the results of the data to determine needs.  Students will also improve their task analysis skills by determining the (1) appropriate task analysis methods and data gathering techniques, (2) gathering data, and (3) analyzing the results for successful task analysis.

Course Text and Materials

Jonassen, D. H., Tessmer, M., & Hannum, W. H. (1999). Task Analysis Methods for Instructional Design. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc., Mahwah: New Jersey.             

Current Journal Articles provided by the Instructor.

INSYS 590: Colloquium

 Course Goal and Overview

INSYS 590 is designed to provide students with both a research and writing experience that will result in the completion of both the paper and presentation.  Specifically, students will be able to understand the purposes as well as procedures to identify a research topic, conduct literature search and review for the topic, and complete a paper and a presentation for the topic.  Instruction as well as guidance will be provided for students to submit the paper for publications and/or conference presentations.

 

Course Text

Publications Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th ed., American Psychological Associations: Washington, DC.

                        Research articles provided by the instructor.

Publications Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th ed., American Psychological Associations: Washington, DC.

                        Research articles provided by the instructor.