Horses in Agriculture

| No Comments
I think horses play a great role in the agricultural industry they help Ranchers get to the far reaches of the ranches out west. Many cattle ranches use horses as there main transportation to get all over the ranch because they can get to many place vehicles can not. They are also a great way to sort cattle when they need to move them or plan to sell them. Cattle Ranch

beef-cattle-ranch-manager-papua-new-guinea.jpg

Horse's role in Farming

| No Comments
I think the primary and most vital role the horse plays in agriculture is with farming. Although many people, including myself, thought that horse's were not really used in farming anymore with advances in technology, but they still are very common. Much new farming equipment has been manufactured to still incorporate the use of a horse pulling the equipment behind it, and this is especially important for the Amish, as they still rely on horses for nearly all transportation.

Amish horses.jpgThe second link is a study researching the budgets for an Amish farmer, and although that may not be particularly relevant, the information about the commonality of Amish farms and shows the horse and human labor requirements conducted on a regular basis.

Horse in Agriculture

| No Comments
I think our horses play a very vital role in agriculture. They are extremely vital in roles such as pulling plows, seeders, and crop turners. They provide an easy, electricity-free way to carry out many necessary tasks in agriculture. The Amish are a prime example of a group of people who still use horses in almost every aspect of agriculture.http://www.personal.psu.edu/wbs14/blogs/horses_agriculture/ Here is some more information regarding the use of horses by the Amish.
http://www.welcome-to-lancaster-county.com/amish-farm.html 
However, they are definitely most important on smaller farms where giant machines cannot be pulled by horses. (http://doubleheartranch.files.wordpress.com/2009/01/forecart4.jpg)
Larger horses are able to do more difficult work, such as cultivating a field. Similarly, for even heavier loads, a bunch of strong horses can be grouped together to carry out a certain task. Here is an example of a horse doing such a task.http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0FiH7LsSYzU All in all, they provide a fairly efficient way to get difficult tasks done that would take a lot of manpower or electricity. They are cost-efficient and environmentally proficient as well. 

The Horse's Role in Agriculture

| No Comments

My Opinion

   In my opinion the horse's role in agriculture is for labor. The horse has been used for plowing, seeding, and pulling wagons/carts. I think that horses are an important part of our agriculture because people have been able to create a working relationship with these animals more than any other animal. Now, there is a lot more technology to help farmers with their crops, so horses are being used more for recreational purposes than for work. The Amish are some of the only people that rely completely on horses and other animals for work or crops.

Image

horses role in agriculture.jpg

Resources

1. http://www.historytoday.com/john-langdon/quiet-revolution-horse-agriculture-1100-1500

2. http://www.nal.usda.gov/awic/pubs/HorseHistory/intro.shtml

 

Horses in Agriculture

| No Comments

Horses have always been crucial to the agriculture industry, and despite a recent decline through the introduction of machinery, they are still a fairly large part of it.

Plowing fields is generally the first step when cultivating land, and is at the top of horses' to-do lists. Although technology has caused a decrease in the number of working farm horses, there are numerous farmers that appreciate the older methods and continue to use them. They use the horses instead of tractors to pull the heavy plows and carts to loosen the soil. That way, the land can be used to grow crops. One farmer, Gregory Morris, states it is his horses' intelligence that drive him to continue working with them. Below are two pictures of horses pulling plows.

Thumbnail image for plowday2.jpgThumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Cropped-1936-Horse-drawn-plow.jpg







One other way horses are still involved in agriculture is cattle herding. These horses, deemed "cow horses," are a very efficient way of leading a large number of cattle from one place to another. The horses must be very well trained and need to actively listen to their rider. Horses are usually used because guiding a large group of a bunch of large animals is stressful, and horses are the easiest way to do it. It allows the herder to maneuver more quickly and gives them the ability to rope stray cattle if necessary. Click this link to read about the horse's importance in cattle drives. Also, here's a video of herding cattle. 

The horse and Agriculture

| No Comments

Labor

cattle ranch hawaii.jpg

Obviously the horse doesn't have quite the same role that it did 100 years ago, but it certainly is still a part of agriculture. I think that there is three main ways in which the horse maintains its role in agriculture. I think one of the more obvious ways, is through the equines application as a labor animal. Though this certainly isn't as common as it once was, horses still serve as labor animals in Amish communities and still on cattle ranches where horses are used to round up cattle that are scattered across the terrain. In fact cattle ranches all over the world still employ horses, even in some really exotic places like Hawaii. Here you can find some really neat national geographic videos and articles depicting the use of horses on cattle ranches. 

Products

horse dairy.jpg

Another way horses establish their presence in the agricultural world is through horse products. Although the horse may be not as popular for this particular use in comparison to other animals, equines can be used as both a livestock and dairy animal. Horse milk has different properties than other animal milks as it has a lower fat percentage and high albumin content, so it can be used for a variety of different uses. Horse milk can also be used in shampoo and certain lotions and creams. This use of the horse has been gaining popularity, particularly in places like Europe.  You can read an article on this unusual practice here. 


Horse feed

horse eating.jpg

Horses also have a presence in agriculture by simply consuming.  A lot of work and effort is put into cultivating and preparing the horses food. Many careers are based on providing feed for various animals including the equine. Crops such as alfalfa, or timothy hay are important facets of the equine diet and without such crops, the equine would not be fed. 


The Horse's Role in Agriculture

| No Comments

Horses play a variety of roles in agriculture all over the world. One of the first things that comes to mind is a horse pulling a plow or other piece of equipment in a field. Many farms have replaced horses with tractors, combines and other machinery, but some people still use them. One example of a group of people who still use horses for farm work are the Amish. Draft horses may not be as strong as oxen, but they are faster when it comes to plowing fields or harvesting crops. Amish also use light horses to pull their buggies.

Thumbnail image for amish-2.jpghorse-and-buggy.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Another aspect of agriculture that horses are involved in is exhibitions at county and state fairs. At my county fair, A Better Way Belgians always put on demonstrations and give wagon rides around the fairgrounds. Also, at the Pennsylvania Farm Show, there are many events for both draft horses and light horses that demonstrate the work horses do on farms.

hershey3.png

Finally, horses are used frequently for work on cattle and horse ranches. They are used to herd and sort cattle or other horses because they are less noisy than ATVs and can maneuver more easily through herds of animals. Similar to this is the use of horses in rodeos. Rodeos demonstrate the work that horses do on ranches in the form of competitions. There are events such as team roping and steer wrestling.

Dude7_CDGRA.jpg60roping472.jpg

 

 

 

The Horse in Agriculture: Education

| No Comments
One hundred years ago, America would be peppered with the scene of horses pulling plows across farmland and pulling wagons to transport people to their destinations.  Today, however, horses have been replaced by tractors and cars.  With that said, I still believe there is a place for the horse in American agriculture, in the form of education.  American agriculture and the food industry is an essential part of this country's history, and with it, the horse is also instrumental. For example, the Budweiser Clydesdales gained their fame from the origins in the 1930s after Prohibition was repealed.  Today, they make appearances at many public events pulling the same type of delivery cart the horses' ancestors pulled in the 1930s. Not only does this speak for the history of one specific company well-known to Americans, but also to the way transportation of agricultural products has changed since the earlier centuries. Here is a video feature on today's equine pop culture icons that also symbolize the American agriculture's past.

Equine demonstrations are also a large portion of fairs and farm shows across the country.  Horse pulling is one example of an event that is reminiscent of an earlier time in American agriculture history.  Horse pulling is modeled after challenges between two teams of horses that would pull heavy wagon loads of goods.  The purpose was to determine who has the strongest horse(s).  Today, these competitions are organized instead of impromptu occasions, and are a positive way to promote the incredible power of horses and also show just how essential horses were to agriculture in both the past and present.

Some helpful links about horse pulling:


A Horse is a Horse, of Coarse... it's a part of Ag!

| No Comments
When people think of agricultural everyone automatically thinks of the different farming industries that make up the big picture of Ag. The beef industry, the dairy and swine industry, the poultry industry and others may think of farming and the big expensive equipment that we use in today's society. But what about the equine industry? Is is a part of our agricultural system today? It most definitely is! So many know that back before all this high tech equipment came out and before cars were the main way of transportation, horses were used. For plowing fields, hauling things around the farm and to simply transport people around. You might say well they aren't used anymore today but as a matter of fact they still are!

In my home town I see many horses out on the road that are attached to a buggy or a plow! The horse is the only thing the Amish have as a mode of transportation and to plow their fields and help with other chores around the farm!  Here is a short video of a modern day horse doing some field work!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nkSUxB9VVXE

Baling hay with horses.jpg

Another way that most people do not think of that horses are involved in agriculture is that horses consume a lot of products! Horses eat a lot of feed!! I know back home at our local auctions the hay sale is based mostly around buyers for horse feed and it is always sold at a relatively high cost. Other than at auctions we have a lot of feed mills that produce a large variety of different horse feeds and minerals! At these local feed mills they purchase their feed from company's like:

- Purina (http://horse.purinamills.com/) 
- Nutrena (http://www.nutrenaworld.com/products/horses/index.jsp)
- Producer Pride (http://www.producerfeeds.com/history.shtml)

Feed store 1.jpg

And as you can see there are endless different products you can choose from!! Millions and millions of dollars goes into feed for the equine industry and not to mention all of the other things horse owners love to pamper their horses with! These are just a few very brief ways that horses are still and will always be involved in our great Agricultural industry!





The Role of Horses in Agriculture

| No Comments
    horse ag.jpg
     The role of horses in agriculture can vary in many ways, they can be used for work, pleasure, therapy, entertainment, or for business people the horses are simply making money for them. I don't think you can give a horse a specific role in agriculture because they are capable of so much. It's all up to the owner's of each horse in determining their role, you can choose to just pleasure ride, some are used for working on farms pulling equipment and herding livestock, or used as race horse's which can potentially make their owners very rich.
therapy.jpg    I think therapy horses have the most admirable role in agriculture, people's lives can be changed forever by just building a special bond with their horse. However, horses can change anyone's lives as long as you have an open heart and open mind. No matter what role you choose for your horse you need to also take in consideration their welfare and what they want. You can't force a horse to be a race horse, if they are not cut out for that they should not be forced upon that role. You need to understand and get to know your horse and when purchasing you must keep in mind that different breeds may be used differently in the industry. Also the nutrition and training is going to vary for different types of work and you need to be aware of this, you won't be feeding the same diet to a race horse you would to a lesson horse, and also the time and labor you have to put in will be much different as well. Depending on which role you choose for your horse there are many different regulations and requirements you must follow below are a few links I came across that I found interesting:

ThoroughbredHorse-racing.jpg

Therapy Horse Requirements


Horses in the Racing Industry

How to Feed and Train a Working Horse




The Role of Horses in the Amish Community

| No Comments
The Amish still use horses to this day.  They use them for farm work and as the primary transportation around the community.  Even though, the Amish still use horses for farm work, the farms are sustainable and successful.  It does take longer to do the farm work just because horses usually walk during this work, so it is a slow process.  As mentioned above, horses are used to pull a buggy for transportation.  There could be one or even two horses pulling a buggy.

amish-boy-lancaster-farm.jpg
Horses as stated are used for work around the farm.  This work consists of horse-drawn equipment used for plowing, cultivating, and even harvesting the crops.  Horses are still used because for most it is easier to navigate horses and it is cheaper for the farmers to own and use horses rather than machinery.  The Amish did try the early tractors, but because the community leaders feared the tractor was too close to automobiles, the tractors were outlawed.  The symbol of using the horse for transportation and farm work is important to the Amish because it identifies them. 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0FiH7LsSYzU  This link takes you to a video that shows Belgian horses cultivating a field.

These links will provide more information on the Amish and their use of horses.

The Horse and its Role in Agriculture Today

| No Comments
Horse with Saddle.jpg
Over the years the horse has played many roles in agriculture from plowing fields, to pulling wagons to driving cows to market but today the horse is no longer a necessity for people's everyday living. One of the contributions that the horse makes to agriculture in today's world is with the saddles, bridles and harnesses that are made from cowhides. There are many different saddle types each designed for its specific use. Most people separate saddles into two categories Western and English. The English saddle is designed to balance the rider in a position which will work on the flat ground and over fences. The Western saddle is made with a higher front and back to provide support for roping, cutting cows from a heard or just safety while riding out on trails.
Saddle.gifThe majority of saddles, harnesses and bridles over the years have been made from leather. The average saddle is made from one entire cowhide. Leather if taken care of is heavy duty and will last a very long time. There are still quite a few people in the world who handcraft saddles; you can custom order a saddle from a number of different saddle makers. Saddle and harness making takes a certain skill set, most of these skills have been passed down from generation to generation. There is even an American Saddle Makers Association.  Saddles can range in price from a few hundred dollars to thousands of dollars. There are not very many companies left in the United States that manufactures western saddles. Here is a video tour of Champion Turf Equipment, Inc.
 Dale Evans.jpg

Interesting fact: In July 2010, after the closing of the Roy Rogers Museum, Christie's Auctions sold Dale Evan's elaborate red and white show saddle for $104,500.

The Horse in Agriculture

| No Comments
The horse plays an extensive role in the lives of many people. Although the horse may not be as important as it used to be, it still is a big contribution to the Amish community, farmers, and as transportation. Horses have played an enormous role in farming. Today, the advancement in technology has replaced horses with tractors. Farmers are able to do more work in less time. However, the Amish community still uses horses for farming and for transportation as well. Pennsylvania has one of the largest populations of Amish. It is not surprising to us to see a horse doing farm work or used as transportation. Amish work horses pull plows, assist with corn picking, and bailing hay.

picking-up-the-corn-valerie-kirkwood.jpg
From used in warfare to used as workers, horses have interacted with humans for thousands of years. There are several jobs for horses that technology has not yet taken over, such as, rounding up cattle and mounted police horses. Horses are even used as tree loggers. We live in a time where our world is promoting alternative energy and going green. Horses can be used as that alternative power and have been used that way for years. They eliminate the use of machines and eliminate the need for mechanics. They run on the food and energy that is grown on a farm. Horses have played a large role in our culture and they will continue to do so even with the advancements in technology in the future.


article-1382425-0BCFB92F00000578-19_306x423.jpg    


The Horse's Role in Agriculture

| No Comments
Although the horse may not play as big a role in agriculture as it used to, there are new niches for the horse that have been opened up more recently.  Yes, it is true that horses are still used greatly in farming, plowing and transportation in the Amish community and other developing nations; however, they generally have been replaced by technology in the US today.  One thing that this website argues is that horses offer services to the agricultural industry, rather than products.  In Kentucky, the equine industry grosses over $1 billion dollars, making horses the state's top cash crop.  The horse industry also links suburban and rural communities, just like the other aspects of the agricultural industry. Horses are used in police work and other recreational activities in cities and suburbs, and people that live in the suburbs or city will travel to rural areas to ride horses. Another website argues that the horses they produce ARE their crop: they grow and maintain them just like any other farmer would grow and maintain their crops. 

Another important thing to consider is horses still maintain a few distinct advantages over cars and other modes of transportation.  For one, the gas for a horse is a lot cheaper than the gas for a car! Check out this story about a group of high school students who didn't want to pay the skyrocketing gas prices and decided to ride their horses to school. Another reason why horses are still a very useful mode of transportation is the fact that they can go places that other vehicles wouldn't be able to.  Horses can climb extreme slopes, jump ditches, and they rarely get stuck in the mud. For example, I was out trail riding yesterday and there was an area of the trail that wasn't cleared well.  The owner of the barn made a note of it, rode back to the barn to get a saw and went back to the trail on horseback later to clear it.  The way the trail was set up, it isn't accessible by car, nor bike, nor 4-wheeler. A horse is the only efficient way to get to that part of the trail. 

WendyL.jpg

Modern Roles of the Horse in Agriculture

| No Comments
According to this USDA website the horse still is a part of US agriculture. The main role for horse's in today's agriculture industry is to help fuel it by consuming the goods produced. The grain and hay that a horse eats every day of its life all comes from farmers working their fields, harvesting, and then selling their products to owners. This supports the economy and the livelihood of farmers since it often brings in billions of dollars every year.

sugary-grain-n-treats.jpgAlthough many in the United States do not see it this way other places overseas look at the horse as if it were the same as a cow or pig and consume their meat. This is an industry within agriculture similar to the fact there are cow farmers who raise for slaughter. Even though I do not believe there are people that actually raise horses for human consumption it still remains that someone is making money off of killing and sending the meat overseas. The horse therefore has a role in agriculture in that it eats the products from farmers and becomes one itself.

Also a lot of people in the cities know nothing about farming and cows, but the allure of the horse is well known and many will go to tourist locations in the west and go on cattle drives to experience animals and roughing it. The cattle industry is part of agriculture and through the horse, people can learn more about farming and where their food comes from. Also besides providing a learning incentive the horse actually works on many farms herding the cattle and helping ranchers get around their property to check fences etc. As of right now I do not believe a tractor has been invented that can heard cows better than the horse.
Here is a video about the horse on a cattle ranch

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hK1Z8NL0Bn0

This shows the horse does have a role in agriculture if a more minor one than in the past. It consumes the products of farming, and is often thought of as a food source itself. The horse is also used in the farming of cattle in many places in the west and as a learning source for people to see what agriculture is all about.

The Horse's Role in Agriculture

| No Comments

 

horse_eating.jpgOne Hundred years ago the horse had a larger role in agriculture than you will see today. But horse's still hold their place in agriculture. Before mahorse and farmer.jpgchinery was invented, horses pulled the plows and helped farmers harvest their crops. Today the farmers help the horses fullfill their most essential need to eat, and that is their major role in agriculture today. Horse feed is compiled by farmers who are invested in agriculture. Horses consume oats, corn, wheat, barley and other grains. On top of the grains they eat roughage such as timothy grass, orchard grass, alfalfa and clover. Horse's are recommended to eat 2.5% of their body weight, but can eat up to 5% according to W. W. Albert. Every horse relies on alfalfacurves.jpgfarmers to grow the grains and roughage that is essential for them to receive adequate nutrition. On average, to feed a healthy 15 hand horse, an owner is going to pay anywhere from $132-$264 a month according to the Back to the Saddle Project. . A portion of that money is going to go back to the farmers. Some agricultural establishments such as Green Horse Wheatgrass in Middletown, California which grows organic greens specifically for equine consumption. Horse's role in agriculture is through association with the farmers who grow their feed.

 

Helpful Links:

http://www.aces.uiuc.edu/vista/html_pubs/horse/horse.html

http://backinthesaddleproject.com/affordahorse.

http://www.greenhorsewheatgrass.com/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Agriculture + Horses = ?

| No Comments
images (1).jpg
When asked the question, "What role do horses play in agriculture?" many people automatically think about the Amish and horses pulling plows and helping farmers grow crops. But what about the Cowboy?! Raising cattle and ranching is in my opinion, just as much apart of agriculture as growing crops and farming.

Horses continue to to be used in ways that don't require them to pull a plow. Out west horses are more often that not still used to herd and move cattle. While there may be close to two hundred cattle in the herd, there many only be a handful of wranglers. Using horses to move the herds is often less stressing on the cattle and the horses are able follow the herd into places that machines such as AVT's and trucks cannot. The tradition of a cattle drive has far from died out, many old time ranchers hold tight to their memories and pass the tradition down to the younger generations. 

images (2).jpg
In addition to moving cattle on the range, San Antonio holds is annual Western Heritage Parade & Cattle Drive. For the cattle drive portion, herds of Texas Long Horns are herded down Main Street, along the Parade route. This annual festival not only brings people from miles around but it also shows that the tradition of driving cattle is alive and well. 

All Work and No Play Makes Jack a Dull... Farmer?

| No Comments
horse riding.jpg
While I love the majestic picture of some farmer plowing the fields at sunset with his horses, this just really doesn't happen anymore. I have heard more than a few farmers joke about useless "hay burners" that do nothing bit sit, eat and rack up vet bills. Yet, farmers still have a few occasionally, ruining pasture at taking up space. Why? I personally think the purpose is simply recreation! It has been proven that animals, specifically horses can reduce stress and lower blood pressure. In stressful seasons of farming, a horseback ride may be one way to get away and relax! This really may seem like a elementary point, but I firmly believe horses still have an integral part in agriculture! Just not the same as how traditionally thought of. Everyone needs a chance to relax. In a way, the relaxation recreational horses provide enable farmers to be more successful in actual work!

A Horse Needs to Eat!

| 2 Comments
After looking over the other entries, I began to wonder what might not have been covered in this discussion of the horse's role in agriculture.  It made perfect sense to talk about the way they were used to flow fields in the past - or even in the present with today's Amish people.  They are still used as everyday transportation for the Amish and Mennonite communities, and of course they serve as companion riders and competitive racers.  But, here's a fact of life that may seem insignificant, yet highly obvious - horses eat!

feeding-time.jpgI know, it may seem a shocking detail, but horses do indeed consume food on a regular basis.  Where does the feed come from? According to this overview from the Michigan State Ag Expo, within Michigan alone, over 60 million dollars was spent on grain and supplements for horses.  Imagine how that money can drive the agricultural market!

Looking at each of these sights, it is quite evident that a great deal of natural ingredients are involved.  These ingredients do not emerge from thin air - but from the hard work of the farming suppliers.  As you can see, the simple everyday requirement to eat is just another way that horses take part in the agricultural industry!

Horse Logging

| 1 Comment
horse logging.jpg
Horses play a role in agriculture in multiple ways but an interesting one that not many people know about is horse logging. This is an environmentally friendly way to log forests. There are many reasons why horses are sometimes used over machinery which include the following:

  • Horses don't cause soil compaction that heavy machinery will.
  • Trees have numerous roots close to the surface of the ground which are easily damaged by heavy machinery.
  • Horses don't cause rutted skid roads that are often associated with large machines.
  • The use of narrow roads also damages fewer trees.
  • Skidding log length instead of tree length allows for tight turns without damaging trees.
Check out this video:

To find more information on horse logging check out these links: 

The Horse in Agriculture

| 1 Comment
HorseAndPlough.jpg
In the past, horses were a tool commonly used in agriculture. Horses were widely used by farmers to pull plows, as well as wagons and carriages which were essential for the economy to survive. However, the need for horses to sustain the economy has steadily decreased as tractors and other modes of transportation have become more prominent. Because horses are not needed for farming and transportation, they are more widely used for sport and leisure. This website explains how horses have been used in the past, including how they were used for farming. 

Personally, the only place where I have knowledge of horses still being used in agriculture is in Lancaster, Pennsylvania by the Amish people. The Amish don't believe in using technology, so they still rely on horses for farming as well as transportation. To learn more about the Amish people and their ways of life, go to this link

While looking into horses in agriculture today, I came across a video that explains how a city is trying to make it so that horses can no longer be considered "livestock" therefore banning them from use in agriculture. 

The use of horses in agriculture has already decreased drastically, and I personally think that in the next couple of years it will be gone all-together, with the exception of the Amish people and maybe a few other groups. I think that the horse will be viewed solely as a sport animal, and used for things such as jumping or dressage, or simply be considered a pet. 

tumblr_loib9oFMUr1qiph9bo1_500.jpg

Horse's Role in Agriculture

| No Comments
horse_drawn_plowing.jpg
When people think about horse's around the world today they think more about things like racing and riding instead of there usage in agriculture.  There are still may people in this world that use horse's for farming like they did back in the day when they didn't have access to the machinery we do today.  Amish people still use horse's for most of their farming still today and as well as transportation.  Horse's are very strong and can be used for many different farming techniques such as plowing, discing, planting, and other cultivating methods.  





workshops.jpg
Not only are horse's used for farming gardens and fields but they are also used in high tunnels and greenhouses.  They are a great for cultivation in these buildings because sometimes you cannot fit large machinery in the high tunnels and the horse's are a better option.  It also helps reduce soil compaction from heavy machinery driving over the soil which leads to better soil health.









horse cultivating.jpg

The Horse's Influence on Agriculture

| No Comments

Not too long ago horses were used to plow fields and used for transportation. Today they have been replaced by cars and tractors. There are still some people who use horses in agriculture. For example the Amish people in Lancaster County Pennsylvania. Here is a link that shows some information on the Amish http://www.welcome-to-lancaster-county.com/amish-farm.html. Some of these people still depend on horses to do their farm work. They believe it is an efficient and easy way and it is something that they enjoy. There are a lot of Amish who are now using tractors in the fields, but a lot of Amish still travel by horse and buggy.home_goshen%20amish%20farmer%20plowing.jpg        

                                                                                                                        

Some farmers or people with small gardens use horse manure compost as fertilizer to grow crops. This is another great way the horse can contribute to agriculture.   

untitled.bmpHorses eat hay constantly. Today hay is selling for about $5.00 to $8.00 a bale! Without our farmers to produce this hay our horses would not be able to live a healthy life style. This is another way horses are contributing to our agricultural industry. Farmers depend on horses to be able to sell their good quality hay throughout the year.

Thumbnail image for timothy.jpg

 

A horse in Agriculture today can also be used on ranches to herd cattle. Here is a video demonstrating how horses manage cattle: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vNDwbNBPjO4 

 

 

 

 

 

The Horse's Role in Agriculture

| No Comments
Many people may think that the horse is no longer involved in the production of  goods in agriculture, and, to an extent, I would have to agree with them. The horse is not nearly as big a part of the agricultural production as it once one, but, it  is still present. The horse was a key component in many agricultural societies for hundreds of years before being replaced by machines. Horses were used for transportation, plowing, seeding, and herding of different kinds of livestock. Despite the introduction of the tractor and other mechanized means of doing farm work, the horse is still used in some societies and capacities. Horses are still used my some operations as a way of moving cattle herds. Another great example of horses still being used is the Amish society.  The Amish use horses  or mules for just about everything, for plowing to transportation. I realize that Amish farms are hardly big producers of goods, but they do often sell their extra produce at local farmers markets or run small stores. 
DanSmithAmishTP.jpg













Horses are also still related to agriculture in a less direct way. They are often seen as a "window into agriculture", giving many people experiences and interesting in the agricultural world. For more information about the horse as a window into Ag, check out this link. 4-H also gets many kids, like myself, more interested and educated in agriculture thought their horse programs, click here for more information on that program. 
images.jpg
Horses also produce another asset to the agricultural community, fertilizer. Manure is an excellent way to fertilize crops, being rich in nutrients for plants and , obviously, completely organic, as well as cheap. It is recommended that it be composted first for use in small gardens, detailed  here along with some more information about using manure as fertilizer. Overall, even though the horse may not be as directly related to agriculture and production as it once was, it is still a part of the agricultural world. 

The Horse's Role in Agriculture

| 2 Comments
Many people may think that the horse is no longer involved in the production of  goods in agriculture, and, to an extent, I would have to agree with them. The horse is not nearly as big a part of the agricultural production as it once one, but, it  is still present. The horse was a key component in many agricultural societies for hundreds of years before being replaced by machines. Horses were used for transportation, plowing, seeding, and herding of different kinds of livestock. Despite the introduction of the tractor and other mechanized means of doing farm work, the horse is still used in some societies and capacities. Horses are still used my some operations as a way of moving cattle herds. Another great example of horses still being used is the Amish society.  The Amish use horses  or mules for just about everything, for plowing to transportation. I realize that Amish farms are hardly big producers of goods, but they do often sell their extra produce at local farmers markets or run small stores. 
DanSmithAmishTP.jpg













Horses are also still related to agriculture in a less direct way. They are often seen as a "window into agriculture", giving many people experiences and interesting in the agricultural world. For more information about the horse as a window into Ag, check out this link. 4-H also gets many kids, like myself, more interested and educated in agriculture thought their horse programs, click here for more information on that program. 
images.jpg
Horses also produce another asset to the agricultural community, fertilizer. Manure is an excellent way to fertilize crops, being rich in nutrients for plants and , obviously, completely organic, as well as cheap. It is recommended that it be composted first for use in small gardens, detailed  here along with some more information about using manure as fertilizer. Overall, even though the horse may not be as directly related to agriculture and production as it once was, it is still a part of the agricultural world. 

The Horse In Agriculture

| No Comments
It is true horses have little to do with the food humans consume or with the fibers used to create clothing, however they still play a vital role in agriculture today. In farming and ranching operations, horses are used to round up herds of cattle and sheep in preparation for meat production. Also, despite the standardization of tractor use in farming, horses continue to plow fields as they did in early history. In fact, horse-drawn plows are becoming more popular, especially among small farm owners. Individuals are turning to horse-powered agriculture because it is first and foremost economical, as horses do not require highly priced fuel. Another benefit is the horse's ability to reproduce and create their own replacements. Also, horses are better for the soil and can be used in inclement weather. To learn more about the modern benefits of horse-powered agriculture follow this link.

cattle.jpg
jeff-johns-and-horse-team.jpg













In addition, horses help provide nature's natural fertilizer, manure. Manure is an excellent fertilizer for pastures and field crops as it contains nitrogen, sulfur, phosphorus, and potassium, which are all required for proper plant growth. Also, it enhances the soil quality, thus improving its structure. Ultimately, manure promotes healthy growth in plant and enables the successful production of crops. To learn more about using horse manure as a fertilizer or how to compost one's manure click here. In conclusion, horses may have little to do with the production of food and goods, but they still play a vital role in agriculture today.

How-Do-I-Use-Horse-Manure-As-Fertilizer-300x243.jpg

Horses Role in Agriculture

| No Comments

Although horses do not directly provide any resources, such as wool or meat, to Americans, they are still an invaluable promoter of an agricultural lifestyle. Children as young as age 8 are able to become involved in 4H, which is a organization of youth who are interested in agriculture. The website of this organization can provide more information, which can be found here. Horses are just one aspect of this club, but they are often the favorite among young girls. This love never goes away in most cases, and they grow up to own horses of their own. Often this means that they choose a rural setting to live in order to have a barn. This leads to an increase in the possibility that they may become involved in other aspects of farming, such as growing hay or keeping other meat animal species, as they already would have the facilities to do so. This is not always the case, but I know for me personally, horses have been the main reason why I want a farm when I grow up.

 

4h.jpg

 

Another way that agriculture is promoted by means of the horse is plowing. Although in todays society, many farmers have the means to purchase a tractor for this purpose, horses are still widely used on farms to till the land. Both Amish and the average Americans alike utilize the horses they already have, making them more productive in the agricultural sense. This use of the original source of horse power is efficient and can be more rewarding when working with your own animals rather than a tractor. Some information on how plowing is done can be found here. Although horses are not mainly owned to be productive agricultural animals, their presence in the world has made many people embrace a more rural lifestyle, offering many possibilities to get involved in other fields of farming.

 

plow.jpg

Horses in Agriculture

| No Comments

Although today we do not use horses directly in farming and agriculture as much as we used to, they are still important to the history of farming and are still used today. Horses began as a food source, their meat was eaten by people. From there people began to use horses in ranching, working the fields, and transportation of goods.

Today horses can still be used in ranching, for example cutting horses are used to remove a cow from a herd so that the animal can be doctored. Horses are still used today in cattle ranching, they are the best method of use in moving cattle over vast distances.The following is a link to a video on the sport of cutting and a little bit of history: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FlnZ5roGPF4 Here is a picture of a horse cutting a cow from the herd:

cutting2.jpg

 

At one time horses plowed fields and tilled the soil by pulling plows. They were also essential for the transportation of goods, pulling wagons of food and supplies that farmers needed or were taking to sale. Here is a website detailing some differences between today's agriculture and past practices: http://animalsmart.org/animals-and-the-environment/comparing-agriculture-of-the-past-with-today 

plowing.jpg

wagon.bmp

The use of horses in those two roles of agriculture are less common today, as they have been replaced by modern transportation and tractors. However the Amish community still utilizes horses as their main method of working fields and transportation. We are lucky enough in Pennsylvania to be fairly familiar with seeing Amish working in the fields with their horses or traveling down the road with a buggy in tow.  

amish.jpg

 

 

Find recent content on the main index or look in the archives to find all content.

Recent Comments

  • ABIGAIL BLACK SHOAF: I think our horses play a very vital role in read more
  • CHEYANNE N BRANDT: I didn't even think about fertilizer! but thats a great read more
  • CHEYANNE N BRANDT: I didn't even think about fertilizer! but thats a great read more
  • NATALIE REA STYER: I really liked this, I'd never thought about it. I read more
  • NATALIE REA STYER: This is soooo true. I agree with Hannah's statement about read more
  • HANNAH KATHERINE ALLEN: This is such a good point! As I talked a read more
  • CAITLIN ELIZABETH EDINGER: The Amish people may use horses for direct agricultural purposes, read more

Recent Assets

  • beef-cattle-ranch-manager-papua-new-guinea.jpg
  • horses role in agriculture.jpg
  • Amish horses.jpg
  • plowday2.jpg
  • Cropped-1936-Horse-drawn-plow.jpg
  • 60roping472.jpg
  • horse eating.jpg
  • horse dairy.jpg
  • cattle ranch hawaii.jpg
  • 19EPView%20Team%20Roping-L.jpg

Categories