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Akhenaten Temple Project LogoAbout the Akhenaten Temple Project

Who we are:

    The Akhenaten Temple Project is an umbrella project of 23 years duration, encompassing four archaeological expeditions to Egypt and north-east Africa.
 

Our general aim:

    To lay bare and analyze through the most modern scientific techniques the most ancient civilization on earth; to study by excavation and geo-physical and geo-archaeological survey the ecology of north-east Africa; to train up students and technicians in history, archaeology, survey, applied physics, palaeo-botany, palaeo-zoology, and ceramic typology.
 

Our record:

    The discovery of the earliest temple of Pharaoh Akhenaten, the first monotheist in history; cleaning and restoration of the tomb of Akhenaten's butler; surface survey of the most ancient transit corridor in Jordan; the excavations of Mendes, largest city in the Nile Delta and sometime capital of Egypt; excavation of Tel Kedwa, an Egyptian border fortress in North Sinai; survey of the North Sinai "land bridge," the only land link between the two largest continents on earth.
 

Our trainees:

    We have trained between 175 and 200 students and technicians over 20 years.

Our supporters:

    Past financial support has come from the Smithsonian with counterpart funds; grants in aid of research from the Killam Program and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada; private donations from our friends; proceeds from a field school run under the aegis of the Pennsylvania State University.
 

Our facilities:

    Laboratory space in the College Park Campus of the Pennsylvania State University; two "dig"-houses affording living, work and storage facilities at Karnak and Mendes in Egypt; one 1979 Peugeot stationwagon; the Jean Woodhams Memorial Library (housed at the Mendes dig-house).
 

Our publications:

    A Newsletter (since 1991), issued quarterly, outlining the work of the preceding season; 4 volumes publishing the results of the excavations at Mendes (to be published by Eisenbraun's Inc.); over 20 articles published in scholarly journals worldwide; journalistic coverage in the New York Times, the Times Literary Supplement, the Lost Angeles Times, El Ahram, the Toronto Star; a one-hour documentary, "The Lost Pharaoh" (NFB-PBS).

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Published 11/10/2000.
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