3x3x3 Blindfolded Solution

 

Difficulty: 3/5

 

Solving a Rubiks cube blindfolded is not nearly as hard as you think it is. At first when I heard about solving a Rubiks cube blindfolded, I thought it would be impossible, but there are actually several methods to solving a Rubiks cube blindfolded using a clearly defined sequence of moves. You absolutely must be able to do the 3x3x3 Beginners Solution before you attempt the 3x3x3 Blindfolded Solution.

 

There are only four steps: corner orientation, edge orientation, corner permutation, and edge permutation. Thats it. These steps probably sound familiar because they were the last four steps in the 3x3x3 Beginners Solution. However, in the 3x3x3 Beginners Solution, you are only orienting and permuting the last layer of the cube. For the 3x3x3 Blindfolded Solution, you are orienting and permuting every piece on the cube, AND you are doing all of it with your eyes closed.

 

It sounds impossible to do, but it is actually not that difficult. The ONLY thing you ever do when solving a Rubiks cube blindfolded is move a certain piece to a certain spot, do a certain algorithm, and then move that piece back to its original spot. The only problem is, you do that about thirty times (sometimes even more) each time you solve the cube blindfolded, and you need to memorize all of thirty of them before you close your eyes.

 

Before we get started, I am going to explain the difference between orientation and permutation. Heres a quick definition of each term. Orientation is the way a piece is positioned in a certain location and permutation is where a certain piece is located.

 

Heres an analogy to help you further understand the difference between orientation and permutation. Lets say you have a classroom with several desks all facing the front of the classroom. Permutation is the location of the desk, and orientation is the way the desk is facing. So for example, if you take one desk and move it all the way to the back of the room, but keep it is still facing the front of the classroom, then that means that desk has correct orientation (because it is still facing the front of the classroom) and incorrect permutation (because it is in the wrong location). Similarly, if you take a desk and just flip it around to make it face the back of the classroom, then that means that desk has correct permutation (because it is still in the same location) and incorrect orientation (because it is not facing the front of the classroom).

 

This same concept works the same with pieces on a Rubiks cube. Below are pictures of pieces on a Rubiks cube with correct permutation and incorrect orientation. It should be easy to see that each piece is in the correct location, but facing the wrong way.

exampleedgeorien3.jpg

 

examplecornerorien3.jpg

 

Ok I think were now ready to get started.

NOTE: For this entire guide, make sure you are holding the cube with the white face on top and the red face in the front, otherwise this guide will not work.

Every picture I show will show of two views. It will either show a view of the white face on the top, red in front, and blue on right, OR the yellow face on bottom, the red in front, and blue on right. This is all shown in the images below.

 

solved3blind(2).jpg

 

solved3bottom(2).jpg

 

Step 1 - Corner Orientation
The first step is getting all of the corners to face the correct way. This is the easiest step in solving a Rubiks cube blindfolded and the steps get progressively more difficult as we move along. The first thing you need to learn to do is to recognize which corners are oriented correctly and which are oriented incorrectly. As it turns out, recognizing this isnt too hard at all. There is only one rule, and that is:

-          A corner is oriented correctly if it has a white or yellow sticker on the top face or bottom face, otherwise it is oriented incorrectly.

Since a corner piece has three stickers on it, a corner has three possible orientations. Two of them are incorrect, and only one is correct. The way I remember which type of orientation a corner has, is that I use numbers to remember how a piece is oriented. If a corner is correctly oriented, I remember it as 0. If it is oriented incorrectly, and need to be rotated 120 degrees clockwise in order to be oriented correctly, then I remember that piece as 1. And if it needs to be rotated 120 degrees counterclockwise, I remember it as 2. For the top layer, I start at the TFL (top front left) corner and remember the pattern in a counterclockwise direction. Heres an example of corner orientation of the top row:

 

samplecornerorien.jpg

 

Remember, we are only worried about the corner pieces on the top row of the cube (for this example). If we start at the TFL corner, we can see that there is a white sticker on the front face, which means it is oriented incorrectly (because the white sticker is not on the top face), and it needs to be rotated 120 degrees counterclockwise to be oriented correctly, which means this corner is remembered by the number, 2. If we are starting at the TFL corner and moving in a counterclockwise direction, the next corner would be the TFR corner. The yellow sticker is on the front face, which means its not oriented correctly. It should be pretty easy to see that the TFR corner should be rotated 120 degrees clockwise in order to be oriented correctly. Remember, we want to get each yellow and white sticker from corner pieces on the top face of the cube, because then, they are oriented correctly. Since the TFR corner needs to be rotated 120 degrees clockwise, this corner is remembered by the number, 1. Now we move on to the next corner, which would be the TBR corner. The yellow sticker is on the right face, which means the corner needs to be rotated 120 degrees clockwise, so this corner is also remembered by 1. Moving on to final corner on the top row, we can see that the white sticker is on the top row, which means it is already oriented correctly, so it is remembered by 0. Now that we know the orientation of each corner on the top row, we can remember the pattern as: 2 1 1 0. If you dont understand this paragraph, read it again, because this concept is crucial to understand for both corner orientation and edge orientation.

 

I only showed an example of the corner pieces in the top layer. You must also remember the orientation of the pieces in the bottom layer. (The only reason Im not showing the bottom layer is because I cant show the top face of the cube and the bottom face of the cube in the same picture.) You need to remember the orientation of every corner in the bottom layer as well as the top layer, EXCEPT for the orientation of the DFL (bottom front left) corner. The reason for this is: if you correctly remember the orientation of the other seven corners, then the last corner will orient itself. But why choose specifically the DFL corner? Why not another random corner? Well I will explain that now.

 

As of now, you should understand what orientation is, and how to remember the orientation of each corner piece. You will end up memorizing a pattern with seven numbers, each number ranging between 0 and 2. The seven numbers will be the orientation of each corner, in this order:

FTL, FTR, BTR, BTL, FDR, BDR, and BDL. An example pattern you could get would be:

1 1 0 2 0 2 1

Where the first number corresponds to the orientation of the FTL corner, the second number corresponds to the orientation of the FTR corner, and so on.

 

Alright, now that you understand how all of that works, the only thing you need to learn now about corner orientation is how to actually orient the pieces. You will need to learn two algorithms, and they are very similar to each other. You only need to perform algorithms on pieces that are oriented incorrectly. If a corner is already oriented correctly, you can skip that piece. No algorithm is required to change the orientation of it since the orientation of it is already correct. Since a corner piece can be incorrectly oriented two different ways, you need to learn two algorithms that take care of each of those cases.

First algorithm (used on pieces remembered by 1): R T R T R T R T D T R T R T R T R D

I know it looks long but its not. Its basically: 2x(R T R T), D, 2x(T R T R), D

Second algorithm (used on pieces remembered by 2): T R T R T R T R D R T R T R T RT D

This is very similar to the first algorithm. This algorithm is: 2x(T R T R), D, 2x(R T R T), D

Here is a picture to show how the first algorithm affects the cube.

 

cornerorientalgo1.jpg

 

And here is a picture to show how the second algorithm affects the cube.

 

 

cornerorientalgo2.jpg

 

 

Both of these algorithms affect the DFL and DFR corners. And they actually affect them in the exact opposite way. If you remember from earlier in this guide, I mentioned that you dont need to memorize the orientation of the DFL corner because if you orient the other corners correctly, then this corner will orient itself. If you need to orient the DFR corner, you are in luck, because you dont have to worry about a setup move which we will discuss later. Since these algorithms only affect the DFL and DFR corners, you need to move whatever corner needs to be oriented to the DFR location (we call this the setup move), do the algorithm, and then do the inverse of the setup move. The only catch is that you also have to do this without moving the DFL corner at all. Heres an example with pictures below. Lets say for example you want to orient the TFL corner, as shown in the image below.

 

examplecornerorien3(1).jpg

 

The first thing you should do is figure out how the piece is oriented. The TFR piece needs to be turned 120 degrees clockwise; therefore it is remembered by 1, further meaning that you will use the first algorithm. The problem is obviously that the algorithm only affects the DFL and DFR corners and you want to orient the TFR corner. How do you orient TFR corner? The answer is simple. Do this algorithm: R. What this did is it put the TFR corner in the DFR position, as shown below.

 

examplecornerorien3(2).jpg

 

As shown above, the TFR corner is located at the DFR position. Now you are ready to do the first algorithm. When you do the first algorithm, the cube will then look like this:

 

examplecornerorien3(3).jpg

 

I think it is extremely obvious what to do from here, however, if you are blindfolded, you wont be able to see the cube; therefore you need to figure out what to do next. Figuring out what to do next is very simple. You just do the inverse of the setup move. In this case, the setup move was R, so the inverse of R would be (R). The two prime symbols cancel out and you simply get, R. If you look above, if you perform the move, R, the cube will be solved.

 

solved3blind.jpg

 

This is how corner orientation works. You should now have a very good understanding of how corner orientation is performed on a cube. Below is a list of all of the setup moves and their inverses needed in order to put any given corner into the DFR slot without effect the DFL slot:

-          TFL corner T R inverse R T

-          TFR corner R inverse R

-          TBR corner R2 inverse R2

-          TBL corner T R2 inverse R2 T

-          DFL corner (not used)

-          DFR corner none (it is already in the DFR slot)

-          DBR corner R inverse R

-          DBL corner B2 R2 inverse R2 B2

 

My best piece of advice is to do it with your eyes open and dont even try to remember the seven-digit pattern. Then try to remember the pattern and do it with your eyes open. Then try to do it with your eyes closed. If you can do that, you probably will have no problem understanding edge orientation.

 

cornersoriented.jpg

 

Step 2 Edge Orientation

Now that you understand corner orientation, edge orientation should be a walk in the park. In some ways, edge orientation is easier and harder than corner orientation. It is easier because an edge can only have two possible orientations, correct (remembered by 0) or incorrect (remembered by 1), rather than three possible orientations on a corner. It is also harder though because instead of remembering a pattern of seven (corners), you need to memorize a pattern of eleven (edges), and an edge is not as easy to recognize whether or not it is oriented. Since there are only two ways an edge can be oriented, you only need to memorize one algorithm for edge orientation. This algorithm uses new notation that I have not explained yet, so I will write the algorithm, and then explain the notation.

 

The algorithm is: M T M T M T2 M T M T M T2

You are obviously familiar with T and T2, but not M. M is known as a slice move. A slice is basically the middle layer. The M slice is the layer between the left and right layers. The difference between M and M you should know is that M is 90 degrees clockwise and M is 90 degrees counterclockwise. But it is in the middle layer, so how do you know which way is clockwise and which is counterclockwise? The answer is that M is 90 degrees clockwise relative to the right face, and M is 90 degrees counterclockwise relative to the right face. Put simply, R is the same direction as M and R is the same direction as M.

 

The algorithm switches the orientation of the TF (top front) edge and TB edge, as shown below.

 

edgeorientalgo.jpg

 

Now I will explain how to recognize whether or not an edge is oriented. These rules are quite a bit more complicated than corner orientation rules. Here they are:

An edge is oriented correctly if:

-          It contains a yellow or white sticker in the top layer or bottom layer of the cube and the yellow or white sticker is on the top face or bottom face.

-          It contains a blue or green sticker in the top layer or bottom layer of the cube and the blue or green sticker is NOT on the top face or bottom face.

-          It contains a yellow or white sticker in the middle layer of the cube and the yellow or white sticker is on the front face or back face.

-          It contains a blue or green sticker in the middle layer of the cube and the blue or green sticker is NOT on the front face or back face.

 

The concept of edge orientation is very similar to that of corner orientation. This time you memorize a pattern with eleven edges, and the edge that you dont need to remember the orientation of is the TF edge. You can memorize the pattern in any order you want, but I think this is the easiest way to remember them:

TR, TB, TL, FL, FR, BR, BL, DF, DR, DB, DL. An example of a pattern you might get would be:

1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0

Each number corresponds to the orientation of each edge.

 

Since the TF edge is the edge that you dont need to remember the orientation of, that is the edge that you wont be moving for edge orientation, and when you need to orient an edge, you move that edge to the position of the TB edge, without affecting the TF edge. Im not going to explain edge orientation nearly as much as corner orientation because edge orientation should be much easier to understand if you already understand corner orientation.

 

It is still the same idea. If an edge is oriented correctly, you simply skip that piece, but if it is oriented incorrectly, you need to do the setup move in order to move that edge to the TB edge slot without affecting the TF slot, do the algorithm, and then do the inverse of the setup move. Here is a list of the setup moves and their inverses for edge orientation:

-          TF edge (not used)

-          TR edge R B inverse B R

-          TB edge none (Its already in the TB slot)

-          TL edge L B inverse B L

-          FL edge L2 B inverse B L2

-          FR edge R2 B inverse B R2

-          BR edge B inverse B

-          BL edge B inverse B

-          DF edge D2 B2 inverse B2 D2

-          DR edge R B inverse B R

-          DB edge B2 inverse B2

-          DL edge L B inverse B L

 

Some final thoughts on both corner orientation and edge orientation:

My best piece of advice is to do it with your eyes open several times until you are comfortable with doing it with your eyes open. Altogether, you will be memorizing a pattern with eighteen numbers (seven from corner orientation and eleven from edge orientation). Try doing corner orientation with your eyes closed. Then try doing edge orientation with your eyes closed. Then try to do both with your eyes closed. If you can do that, congratulations. Youre halfway there.

 

edgesoriented.jpg

 

Step 3 Corner Permutation

At this point, your entire cube is oriented. If you did corner and edge orientation correctly, then every piece is in the EXACT same location that it was in even before you started solving it, but all of the pieces are oriented correctly. If you are comfortable with doing corner and edge orientation, dont get too excited yet. Youre only halfway there, and this is the harder half.

 

Permutation is completely different than orientation. This time, you arent worried at all about how a piece is flipped (how a piece is oriented) but only where it is located. There is only one algorithm needed for both corner permutation and edge permutation. It seems odd that you are using the same algorithm for edges and corners, but the mathematical limitations of the cube say that if you are going to swap the permutation of any two corners, then you also must swap the permutation of any two edges, and vice versa.

 

Here is the algorithm that is used for corner permutation and edge permutation:

R T R T R F R2 T R T R T R F

What this algorithm does is it swaps the permutation of the TFR corner and the TBR corner, AND it swaps the permutation of TR edge and the TL edge, while preserving orientation of every piece on the cube. The picture below illustrates this. The red arrows indicate which pieces are swapped.

 

permutation.jpg

 

For now, we only want to switch the permutation of the corners, and keep all edges the same. However, each time you do the algorithm, you will also switch the permutation of the edges. But, if you do the algorithm again, then you will switch the permutation of the edges again, therefore putting the edges back to its original spot. This means that you must do the algorithm an even number of times in order to preserve edge permutation. I will discuss this in more detail later.

 

Here is how corner permutation basically works: The first thing you need to do is look at the TFR corner. Lets say for example that corner is the blue/red/yellow corner. The blue/red/yellow corner always belongs in the DFR slot. So, now, you look at the DFR corner, and see which piece is there. Lets say for example, it is the yellow/blue/orange corner. The yellow/blue/orange corner always belongs in the DBR slot. Then you look at whatever piece is in the DBR slot, and see where that piece goes, etc until you get back to the TFR corner. You need to memorize the pattern of which corners you visited. In this example, the first corner you would remember would be DFR, then DBR, and that is all I included in this example. I think that the easiest way to memorize the pattern is to assign each corner a number.

The way I personally remember it using these numbers:

-          TFL corner 1

-          TFR corner 2

-          TBR corner 3

-          TBL corner 4

-          DFL corner 5

-          DFR corner 6

-          DBR corner 7

-          DBL corner 8

Whenever you reach the number 2 (the TFR corner), a couple of things can happen. The tricky part about the 2 corner is that it cant be part of the pattern. The TFR corner has the same purpose as the DFL corner in corner orientation and the TF edge in edge orientation. This is the piece that will permute itself, assuming that you permute everything else correctly. Your pattern will never contain the number 2. In a way, it is just a place holder on the cube. If your pattern contains every number from 1 to 8 (except 2), then that is the only pattern you need to remember for corner permutation. For example, your patter might be:

3 8 1 7 6 4 5

Notice that each number is used exactly once, and the number 2 is not included. Technically, the 2 belongs before the 3, and after the 5, because that is the order in which the corners are ordered, but the reason that 2 is not included is because the pattern listed above is because this pattern only represents the order in which to permute the corners. Each of these numbers corresponds to where each corner belongs. In this example, it would mean that the corner at position 2 belongs in the 3 slot, the corner at position 3 belongs in the 8 slot, the corner at position 8 belongs in the 1 slot and so on. It is always implied that 2 is the first one in the pattern, but again, is not included because you dont need to permute it.

 

Sometimes, however, you wont be so lucky and have a pattern that contains every piece. Actually sometimes you will have a pattern with less numbers, and sometimes you will have a pattern with more numbers. Ill give you an example of each.

 

Lets say that for example, the corner 6 (the DFR corner) is already permuted correctly. Since it is already permuted correctly, you can just skip it, and not include it in the pattern. So your pattern might be:

3 8 4 7 5 1

Notice that each is only used exactly once, the number 2 is not included, and the number 6 is not included. Sometimes, you might get really lucky and maybe have a pattern with only five numbers maybe even four. It all depends on what is already permuted and what needs to be permuted. Whichever pieces are already permuted are to be ignored and not included in the pattern.

 

Sometimes you wont be so lucky. You will have to memorize a pattern with repeat numbers. Youre probably wondering how a pattern can contain any one number more than once. This is possible if you reach the 2 slot before you visit every incorrectly permuted corner. Let me give you an example. Lets say for example you have start at the 2 slot (as always), then go to 7, then 3, then after 3, you are already back to the 2 slot. So far, your only patter is: 7 3 (because we never include any 2s in the pattern). The problem is, you have some corners that are still incorrectly permuted, and were not included in this pattern. To fix this, you need to start another pattern. Lets say that for example, in this particular case, the corner in slot 1 is still incorrectly permuted. You can start your pattern there if you want, or you can start it anywhere else where an incorrectly permuted piece is located. So, if we start this pattern at slot 1, the pattern might be something like this: 1 8 5. And then the number 5 belongs in the 1 slot again. So you have these two loops between slots 7, 3, and 2, and the other loop you have is between slots 1, 8, and 5. (Ill just assume that for this example, slots 4 and 6 are already permuted correctly.) When you have two completely separate patterns like this, this is what you need to do: Treat the first pattern (the pattern including the 2) as if it were a normal pattern, so as of now, your only pattern is: 7 3. Again, we dont include the 2. For the second pattern, you add the second pattern directly after the first pattern, and then after that, you add the first number in the second pattern at the end. So, in this case, it would be: 7 3 1 8 5 1.

By the way, it doesnt matter where you start the second pattern. You are free to choose whichever corner slot that you want to start the pattern, which will also be the piece that ends the pattern. These other patterns would also be acceptable:

7 3 1 8 5 1 (this is the example I used originally)

7 3 8 5 1 8

7 3 5 1 8 5

As it turns out, in the end, each of these patterns affects the cube in the EXACT same way, so there is no advantage to choosing one over the other. I usually just whichever one I find first.

 

Sometimes you will be even more unlucky and have three separate patterns. An example of this might be:

3 1 4 5 8 5 6 7 6

Where the (3 1 4) is the original pattern, excluding the 2, the (5 8) is another pattern, the (5) is the first number in the second pattern (which, as stated above, needs to be placed at the end if another pattern is started), the (6 7) is a third pattern, and the (6) is the first number in the third pattern. There are very few cases in which you will need to remember a pattern this long. There are however, several cases in which you will need to start a second pattern, and if that happens, all you need to do is do the second pattern right after the first pattern, and just put the first number in the second pattern at the very end of the second pattern.

 

Alright now that you know how to determine what the pattern will be, you now need to know how to use that pattern in order to successfully perform the algorithm and permute each corner. This part of permutation is similar to that in orientation. What you need to do is permute each piece, one at a time, in the order that the pattern tells you. If a corner needs to be permuted, you need to do a setup move that moves that corner to the TBR corner, do the algorithm, and then do the inverse of the setup move. You need to do a setup move that not only doesnt affect the location of the TFR corner, the TR edge, and the TL edge, but you also need to preserve the orientation of the corner that you are going to put in the TBR corner. Figuring out these setup moves on your own would be quite challenging, so I have listed below a list of setup moves and their inverses for corner permutation.

-          Corner 1 L2 B2 L2 inverse L2 B2 L2

-          Corner 2 (not used)

-          Corner 3 none (it is already in the TBR corner)

-          Corner 4 B2 D B2 inverse B2 D B2

-          Corner 5 D B2 inverse B2 D

-          Corner 6 D2 B2 inverse B2 D2

-          Corner 7 D B2 inverse B2 D

-          Corner 8 B2 inverse B2

 

Ok, there is only one more concept you have to understand for corner permutation. Remember that one algorithm is used for both corner permutation and edge permutation. If, when doing corner permutation, your full pattern contains an even number of numbers, then you can totally ignore this step, but if your pattern contains an odd number of numbers, then you need to do this simple extra step. The algorithm MUST be used an even number of times in order to preserve edge permutation for the next step. The way to fix this is simple. If your entire pattern contains an odd number of pieces, add a 3 to the end of your pattern in order to do the algorithm an even number of times. Heres an example of a pattern with an even number of numbers and one with an odd number of numbers.

3 2 8 7 6 1

As you notice, this algorithm has an even number of numbers, so you simply leave it alone.

Here is one with an odd number:

7 3 1 4 8 5 6

This has an odd number of numbers, so you need to add a 3 to the end of it. The new pattern is:

7 3 1 4 8 5 6 3

Now the pattern has an even number of numbers, so you are good to go for edge permutation.

NOTE: You will not encounter this problem during edge permutation.

 

cornerspermuted.jpg

 

Step 4 Edge Permutation

This step is very similar to corner permutation; therefore I wont be taking nearly as much time to explain it. As mentioned before, this step uses the same algorithm as corner permutation. Ill type it here again so that you dont have to keep on scrolling back up to see it: R T R T R F R2 T R T R T R F

This uses the same principle as corner permutation. You need to memorize a pattern in the order of which the edges need to be permuted. I suggest doing this pattern using numbers. Here are the numbers I use:

-          TF edge 1

-          TR edge 2

-          TB edge 3

-          TL edge 4

-          FL edge 5

-          FR edge 6

-          BR edge 7

-          BL edge 8

-          DF edge 9

-          DR edge 10

-          DB edge 11

-          DL edge 12

This time, coincidentally, the number 2 is never included in a pattern, just like the number 2 wasnt included in corner permutation. And this time, if an edge needs to be permuted, you do a setup move in order to move it to the TL edge (slot 4), do the algorithm, and then do the inverse of the setup move. Literally everything else about edge permutation is like that of corner permutation. Just like corner permutation, if you need to start a second pattern, just start the pattern right after the first pattern, and then put the first number in the second pattern at the end of the second pattern. Thats basically it. The only thing you need now are the setup moves and their inverses for edge permutation, which I have here listed below. Before I do that, there is one type of notation that you havent seen yet, which I will first explain, and then have a list of the setup moves and inverses.

 

You now need to learn a new type of slice move. This slice move is notated by E. The E slice is the layer between the top layer and bottom layer. The difference between E and E is that E is the same direction as T and E is the same direction as T.

 

Now that you know this new type of slice move, here are the setup moves and their inverses:

-          Edge 1 F E L F inverse F L E F

-          Edge 2 (not used)

-          Edge 3 B E L B inverse B L E B

-          Edge 4 none (already in the TL slot)

-          Edge 5 L inverse L

-          Edge 6 E2 L inverse L E2

-          Edge 7 E2 L inverse L E2

-          Edge 8 L inverse L

-          Edge 9 D L2 inverse L2 D

-          Edge 10 D2 L2 inverse L2 D2

-          Edge 11 D L2 inverse D L2

-          Edge 12 L2 inverse L2

 

solved3blind.jpg

 

Well, thats it. Here you have all of the information you need to solve a Rubiks cube blindfolded. Now Ill give some final thoughts and tips on solving a Rubiks cube blindfolded. With all of the setup moves and inverses, I only put them on this webpage to let you think less. You do have a lot of other things on your mind with solving a Rubiks cube blindfolded, obviously, so that is why I gave you a list of all of the moves and their inverses. When you get comfortable enough, you should be able to just reason out what the setup moves and inverses will be without needing to memorize them.

 

The concept that I had the hardest time understanding when I starting solving the cube blindfolded is: How can you know if you are encountering a problem if your eyes are closed? How do you sense when you are encountering a problem? Well, I quickly found out that the answer is: There is no way to sense whether or not you are encountering a problem when your eyes are closed. You need to plan out absolutely everything before you close your eyes. Once your eyes are closed, you have to rely on your memorization of the numbers to solve the cube. When you think about it, all that you need to do in order to solve a Rubiks cube blindfolded is just memorize a pattern of numbers. Thats it. You are doing nothing else. The pattern will look something like this:

0 2 1 0 1 1 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 5 8 4 7 9 3 7 3 10 3 7 8 4 12 9 5

^corner orientation^ edge orientation ^corner permutation^ edge permutation^

 

I highly doubt that you will successfully solve a Rubiks cube blindfolded on your first attempt. There are always either two edges oriented incorrectly, or three corners permuted incorrectly. Dont give up. The fact that you even get that far proves that you have learned so much. If you stick to it, you will definitely eventually get it, and pretty soon, it will seem easy. The hardest part of solving a Rubiks cube blindfolded is not actually turning the pieces on the cube. Its not doing the setup moves, or the algorithms, or the inverses of the setup moves. That part is easy. The hard part is remembering the pattern consisting of about 35 numbers, and if you forget even one number, you wont successfully solve the cube blindfolded.

 

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