President's Day

| 0 Comments | 0 TrackBacks

Happy President's Day!

presidential elections.jpgAs We celebrate and recognize the men who have led our country.  I thought it would be interesting to review the voting history of Wyoming (where I'm from)  in comparison to Pennsylvania (where I live) and then to California (for variety).

Since I moved to Pa I have been told more than once that since I was from Wyoming "Of course Your Republican".  Does geography play a large factor in a political bent?  Are people from more populated areas automatically Democrats any more than people from the wide open, least populated state of Wyoming Republican?  I'm not sure; I'll ever know the answer to this question..... However, I can look at the history of the state and compare.

Starting with the 1892 election ending with the 2008 election; Wyoming being the state that was added to Union the latest in 1890.

  • ·        Wyoming gave Republican Candidates their electoral votes in 22 out of 30 times, 8 times to Democratic Candidates
  • ·        Pennsylvania gave Republican candidates their electoral votes in 17 out of 30, 1 year to the Progressive Party Candidate, and 12 times to Democratic Candidates
  • ·        California gave Republican candidates their electoral votes in 14 out of 30, 2 years they split their votes between the two parties, 13 times they gave them completely to the Democratic Party Candidate and 1 year to the Progressive Party Candidate.

From this information and the limit to elections between 1892-2008, all of these three states have given their electoral votes to the Republican Party more than the Democratic Party.  Draw what conclusions you want from this information and have a look at the maps.  You can view sections of this map from the National Atlas. Call Number: G3701.F9 2000.G4

In the nature of the election process of the United States maps are used to show the progress of one candidate or another.  Many maps will be produced to predict, sum up, and review the voters throughout the coming election.  Here you can map the current election on 270 to Win. 

Here is an election map of 2008 that reflects the population density in a specific area verse the actual land mass.  Since cartogram 2008 presidential election.jpgit is the population that influences the Electoral College and not the acreage, this image portrays the actual votes more visually accurately.  Even thou, I'm not known for my WYO pride, I feel a little sad when I see it disappear in the cartogram.  Still knowing WYO is the least populated state, it would make sense being so small.  (more explanation of this map/cartogram can be found in this link )

We have the Atlas of the Real World referred to in this blog post. It's is fun to stroll through and see the changes when acreage is removed as a factor.  Call Number: Maps G1021.D586 2008



No TrackBacks

TrackBack URL: https://blogs.psu.edu/mt4/mt-tb.cgi/331874

Leave a comment

Subscribe to receive notifications of follow up comments via email.
We are processing your request. If you don't see any confirmation within 30 seconds, please reload your page.

Search This Blog

Full Text  Tag

Recent Entries

More on Indexes
Several months ago, after struggling to use an oversized, faded and pieced-together index of our Pennsylvania aerial photo holdings,…
Dr. Seuss in the Maps Library
Last week, the Educational and Behavioral Sciences Library held an open house celebrating Dr. Seuss who was born on March…
President's Day
Happy President's Day! As We celebrate and recognize the men who have led our country. I thought it would…