Properties of Water Lesson Plan

Propertied of Water Lesson Plan Evaluation Form


Component


Description

Max

Pts


Points

Source Information

The authors of the lesson are clearly indicated, as well as the source of the lesson plan:

 

http://www.biologylessons.sdsu.edu/classes/lab1/

These lessons were compiled and posted on line by San Diego State University as service to teachers in San Diego and around the country with support from a NSF grant DUE-9555089.

 5

5

Grade level and topic

Is the grade level and general topic of the lesson clearly indicated and appropriate?

5

5

Standards and inquiry

Is at least one relevant State or National science or environmental education standard clearly identified, and is it substantively addressed in the lesson?

 5

5

Instructional objectives

Is it clear from the statement of the lesson objectives what a student should be able to do as a result of completing the lesson?

10

10

Materials, equipment, and set-up

Are the materials and equipment needed for this lesson described clearly enough that another teacher could set it up and carry it out?

 10

10


Body of the Lesson

If evaluating a unit or an entire curriculum, look for the following elements in at least

 a couple of lessons.
 

Engagement

Will students' attention be gained early in the lesson?  Will their initial conceptions be solicited?

 10

10

Exploration

Can you perceive a clear guiding question/purpose for the lesson?  Will the students collect data or retrieve interesting data from elsewhere?  Are the instructions for doing this clear?

 15

15

Explanation

Will the students be able to make sense of their exploration?  Are they asked to report what they learn?

 15

15

Elaboration

Are there suggestions for extending the lesson (e.g., for advanced students)?

 10

10

Evaluation

Is there a mechanism for evaluating students' understandings?  Does that mechanism match the lesson's objectives?

 15

15

DISCRETIONARY

Any additional points you wish to assign for especially good treatment in any section of the lesson plan (maximum of 10)

 10

10

 

 

 

 

 

 

           

            The property of water lesson plan is one of a total of 17 lesson plans related to molecules, cells, and population biology at this website.  These lessons were compiled, modified then posted on line for use by teachers nationwide by San Diego State University College of Science (SDSU) with support from the National Science Foundation grant DUE-9555089.  This lesson plan extensively addresses the AAAS standards for cells (Section C)under the Living Environment (Chapter 5).   The overall lesson is geared more to middle school science grades of 7th and 8th, but there are many experiments and topics that would be easy to teach in the elementary science units with minor modifications.  I also gave full points to the instructional objectives and material/set-up section since everything was listed for each experiment with simple step by step description of the hands-on experiments.  Not only did the lesson plan list 6 broad objectives for the week long lesson sequence, it also listed questions to ponder related to water and why it is important to life.  

            This lesson was a coupled inquiry where the students start out in a guided inquiry.  The lesson plan already has questions for the students to address through the experiments and their data collection.  There is then opportunity for the students to generate their own questions from the week long lesson sequence to further explore a topic that interests them.  POE is used throughout the several experiments. Students document their predictions, carry out the experiment, document their observations, then they work with their group to explain what happened and why.  By allowing the students to present their findings back to the class, the teacher can promote discourse and argumentation.

            There were also "questions to ponder" given in the lesson plan before the background information on the subject was introduced. The experiments will capture the students' interest early in the lesson plan as they explore how water drops collect on a surface of a penny with and without detergent added to explore the concept of surface tension.  I felt the lesson engage the students well so I award all points.  I plan to use the "questions to ponder" as an assessment at the beginning of the unit to assess the prior knowledge my students have about water and its properties.  The next several experiments allow the students to explore other properties about water such as the climbing property of water and cohesion.

            The guiding question throughout this unit is understanding the properties of water based on what the students observe during the various hand-on experiments.  The students are asked to examine their data and explain how it supports their observations.  Since the students explore the topics then they are asked to make sense of the information, I awarded full points to the exploration and explanation sections.  I was impressed that the lesson plan had alternative ideas for what students might think related to structure of water, size of water molecule, states of water, and the mechanism for dissolving so as a teacher I can address some expected misconceptions.

            I felt the lesson plan provides opportunity for students to elaborate on the topic by further researching the key topics in the unit.  The lesson plan had various on-line concept maps that students could click on to explore the interconnected network of ideas.  I awarded 10 points to the elaboration section since it allowed advanced students to extend their lessons.  There were assessment questions in the various experiments for the students to explore and discuss with the class.  In addition to group presentations, I would use concept mapping to evaluate student's knowledge at the end of the lesson.     Because I felt this lesson plan was so through and had extensive background information for the teacher to make this sequence a success, I awarded an additional 10 points.  I was impressed that the website has additional lesson plans related to the properties of water and molecules that I could use to further build my students' scientific knowledge.  I would be able to link the various lesson plans on this website to develop a 6-8 week sequence related to molecules and cells which is a key topic in middle school science curriculum.

 

           

           

           

 

 

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