THE AMERICAN JOURNAL OF DISTANCE EDUCATION

 

The Influence of Learning Style Preferences on Student Success in Online Versus Face-to-Face Environments
Steven R. Aragon, Scott D. Johnson, and Najmuddin Shaik
Department of Human Resource Education, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

THE AMERICAN JOURNAL OF DISTANCE EDUCATION, 2002

Using three learning style instruments, researchers assessed students enrolled in an online instructional design course and students in an equivalent face-to-face course to determine the students’ preferences across the constructs of motivation maintenance, task engagement, and cognitive controls. Although significant differences were found between the learning style preferences of the online students and those of the face-to-face students, these differences were not significant when success factors were controlled. The results of this study suggest that students can learn equally well in either delivery format, regardless of learning style, provided the course is developed around adult learning theory and sound instructional design guidelines.

 

Aragon 2002.pdf

 

Teaching Time: Distance Education Versus Classroom Instruction
Diane M. Bender, School of Design, Arizona State University
B. Jeanneane Wood, Human Environmental Studies, Central Michigan University

THE AMERICAN JOURNAL OF DISTANCE EDUCATION, 2004

 

This study presents time-and-task records of faculty and teaching assistants’time for comparable computer-aided design courses at twostate universities in the midwestern United States. One course wastaught at a distance and the other course was a conventionalface-to-face course. Results indicate a distance course takes less timeto teach than a traditional classroom course, if student enrollment andassessment procedures are not included in analysis. When analyzed ona per-student basis, both faculty and teaching assistant timewas higherfor the distance course.

 

Notes: They have cited your 2000 research paper.

 

Bender 2004.pdf

 

Cognitive Style andSelf-Efficacy: Predicting Student Success in Online Distance Education
Monica DeTure, Applied Center for Instructional Design, Florida Community College at Jacksonville

THE AMERICAN JOURNAL OF DISTANCE EDUCATION, 2004

 

This study was designed to identify those learner attributes that maybe used to predict student success (in terms of grade point average) in a Web-based distance education setting. Students enrolled in six Web-based, general education distance education courses at a community college were asked to complete the Group Embedded Figures Testfor field dependence/independence and the Online Technologies Self-Efficacy Scale to determine their entry-level confidence with necessary computer skills for online learning. Although the studentswho were more field independent tended to have higher online technologies self-efficacy, they did not receive higher grades than those students who were field dependent and had lower online technologiesself-efficacy. Cognitive style scores and online technologies self-efficacy scores were poor predictors of student success in online distance education courses.

 

DeTure 2004.pdf

 

Relationships Between Intern Characteristics, Computer Attitudes, and Use of Online Instruction in a Dietetic Training Program
Ruth E. Litchfield, Mary Jane Oakland, and Jean A. Anderson,
Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Iowa State University

THE AMERICAN JOURNAL OF DISTANCE EDUCATION, 2002

 

Changes in health care and educational technology instigated the use of interactive online instruction in this preprofessional training program. Cooperative learning strategies, which require the interns to interact with each other, were incorporated into the online instruction to initiate learner/instructor and learner/learner interaction. Seventy-five dietetic interns from 3 universities were randomly assigned to groups with and without online instruction. Computer attitudes and use of the technology were examined. Demographic variables and previous computer experience did not influence the use of the online instruction. However, those who reported a preference ofworking with others used the online instruction more (p = .05). The amount of time reported using the online instruction had a positive effect on overall computer attitude and comfort using computers. Significant improvement in self-efficacy with the World Wide Web occurred irrespective of the treatment.

 

Litchfield 2002.pdf

 

Michael Moore
What Does Research Say About the Learners Using Computer-Mediated Communication in Distance Learning?

THE AMERICAN JOURNAL OF DISTANCE EDUCATION, 2002

 

Moore 2002.pdf

 

Learning Style and Effectiveness of Online and Face-to-Face Instruction
Charlotte Neuhauser, School of Business, Madonna University

THE AMERICAN JOURNAL OF DISTANCE EDUCATION, 2002

 

In this study the investigator compared two sections of the same course—one section was online and asynchronous; the other was face-to-face—by examining gender, age, learning preferences and styles, media familiarity, effectiveness of tasks, course effectiveness, test grades, and final grades. The two sections were taught by the same instructor and used the same instructional materials. The results revealed no significant differences in test scores, assignments, participation grades, and final grades, although the online group’s averages were slightly higher. Ninety-six percent of the online students found the course to be either as effective or more effective to their learning than their typical face-to-face course. There were no significant differences between learning preferences and styles and grades in either group. The study showed that equivalent learning activities can be equally effective for online and face-to-face learners.

 

Neuhauser 2002.pdf

 

Evaluation of Student Satisfaction: Determining the Impact of a Web-Based Environment by Controlling for
Student Characteristics

Veronica A. Thurmond, Karen Wambach, and Helen R. Connors, University of Kansas Medical Center
Bruce B. Frey, University of Kansas

THE AMERICAN JOURNAL OF DISTANCE EDUCATION, 2002

 

In this article, the authors discuss research findings of an evaluation of Web-based courses in which the researcher controlled for student input information—using Alexander Astin’s (1993) Input-Environment- Outcome assessment model. Controlling for student characteristics decreased bias and minimized the chance of incorrectly attributing outcomes to the virtual environment. The results of this study support the view that students’ satisfaction was influenced by the online environment and was not due to student characteristics.

 

Thurmond 2002.pdf

 

Student Views of Effective Online Teaching in Higher Education
Suzanne Young, University of Wyoming

THE AMERICAN JOURNAL OF DISTANCE EDUCATION, 2006

 

This study investigated student views of online instruction in higher education courses. Data were collected from 199 online students using a Web-based instrument. The instrument consisted of items that were expected to be associated with effective online teaching. One overall effective teaching item was regressed onto twenty-five items in order to identify a core group of items that related most strongly with effective teaching. Seven items emerged as the core group: adapting to student needs, using meaningful examples, motivating students to do their best, facilitating the course effectively, delivering a valuable course, communicating effectively, and showing concern for student learning. These seven items explained 86.2% of the variability in effective teaching and provided one definition of effective online teaching. In open-ended comments, the students wrote that effective teachers are visibly and actively involved in the learning, work hard to establish trusting relationships, and provide a structured, yet flexible classroom environment.

 

Young 2006.pdf

 

Validating an Approach to Examining Cognitive Engagement Within Online Groups
Peter K. Oriogun, Department of Computing, Communications Technology and Mathematics London Metropolitan University Andrew Ravenscroft and John Cook Learning Technology Research Institute London Metropolitan

THE AMERICAN JOURNAL OF DISTANCE EDUCATION, 2005

University Tools for measuring cognitive engagement within online groups have been concerned only with measuring an individual participant’s cognitive engagement, without any concern for measuring cognitive engagement within groups. There remains a serious need for a scheme that measures cognitive engagement of groups and the validation of such a scheme against existing methods. The SQUAD (coding categories that are being measured, a semistructured approach for scaffolding online groups’ engagement) approach to computer-mediated communication (CMC) discourse invites students within their respective groups to post messages based on five given categories: (a) suggestion, (b) question, (c) unclassified, (d) answer, and (e) delivery. In this article, the authors validated the SQUAD approach at the message level with an established framework called the practical inquiry model for assessing cognitive presence of CMC discourse. They adopted the alignments suggested by one of the developers of the Transcript Analysis Tool at sentence level to assess students’ cognitive engagement within online groups in three case studies presented in this article. The authors argue that the cognitive presence attributed to the SQUAD approach has been empirically validated with respect to cognitive engagement within groups online.

 

Oriogun 2005.pdf


The Development of an Instrument to Evaluate Distance Education Courses Using Student Attitudes
T. Grady Roberts Department of Agricultural Education Texas A & M University Tracy A. Irani, Ricky W. Telg, and Lisa K. Lundy Department of Agricultural Education and Communication University of Florida

THE AMERICAN JOURNAL OF DISTANCE EDUCATION, 2005

This study sought to adapt and test a methodological framework designed to produce a course evaluation that addresses the unique aspects of distance education while maintaining consistency with current evaluation instruments commonly used to evaluate an institution’s on-campus courses. Using the four-step process adapted from Biner (1993), twenty items were identified for inclusion in the instrument. The authors concluded that the four-step process yielded an instrument for the evaluation of distance education courses that provides both functionality and flexibility to be used across a variety of courses.

 

Roberts 2005.pdf