OVERVIEW AND SITE MAP: Brief for the Arabs

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1. Envoy Perspective

2. Brief

3. Protocol Log

4. Bargaining Plan

 

5. Proposal

6. Negotiations

7. Recommendation

 

 


Welcome to Jerusalem! Your corps' chief representative is Palestinian Liberation Organization (PLO) leader Yasser Arafat.

Thank you for making the commitment to become part of the corps. Your commitment is crucial because the expertise of all envoys is needed to see the big picture of the Arab-Israeli conflict and necessary for your corps to present its best argument for peace.


 

 

BRIEF: BECOME AN EXPERT

 PURPOSE

Each envoy will review a specific set of resources and learn about the Arab-Israeli conflict from the perspective of the type of envoy each will become. Each perspective will take the form of a brief. A brief is a concise but thorough analysis. Each brief will differ depending on the type of envoy.

 

Click on the type of envoy to which you have committed.

 

 

|AMBASSADORS|

|DIPLOMATS|

|JOURNALISTS|

|MILITARY TACTICIANS|

 

 

AMBASSADORS

MISSION

 

 

KIND OF BRIEF

Your brief will be written like a treaty. A treaty is a formal list of actions agreed upon by at least two groups who have a disagreement. The example below shows the format (eg. 1., bullet, and status) and what should be written in each part of the format. Please type your brief using the same title and signature lines as shown below.

 

 

EXAMPLE FORMAT OF A TREATY

Brief of the Progress of Peace Regarding the Arab-Israeli Conflict

Your brief will be a list of 10 actions the Arabs and Israelis must fulfill according to all current treaties. The first action of the numbered list should be the most important; the last should be the least important action. The 10 actions should be the best 10 actions that answer these key questions:

Status: The status of the fulfillment of those actions will follow.

Done on the___day of_______ (year).

Witnessed by:

____________________________________________

The Palestinian Liberation Organization (Please sign your name.)

 

 

SPECIFICATIONS

        1. Each ambassador will submit a brief that will be unique from the other ambassadors in your corps.
        2.  

        3. Use citations to indicate sources of information. Specifically, the title, date, and page number of sources must be typed like this:
        4. Example: (Wye Memorandum - 1995, p. 1). The citation should appear at the end of a sentence, before the period and within parentheses.

           

        5. On a separate page, attached to the back of your brief, type a list of 5 questions that you have as a result of your research.
        6.  

        7. Write your brief using formal language (void of contractions and emotion). Your brief should be 3 typed pages each double-spaced.

 

 

QUESTIONS?

Send me a note! Click here annkulp@redrose.net to e-mail me. Type your question and your name in the large window and then click on the send button at the top of the screen. I'll answer your questions and address your concerns as fast as possible.

 

 

SCHEDULE: You have 7 days to complete your brief.

DAY 1, 2, & 3:

        1. Review the rubric for your brief. The rubric is a measurement of different levels of the quality of writing. Your brief will be assessed based on this rubric.
        2.  

        3. Read the resources. In fact, read them as fast as you can but be sure you can still comprehend what you are reading. As you read more resources, you will become comfortable with the language and begin to understand points that will be repetitive! Look for and write down each point that answers the key questions (record its citation, too). Click on flashlight.
        4. Resources

        5. Evaluate your list of points and limit it to 10 of the best answers to the key questions.

 

DAY 4 & 5:

Read the resources again. Look for supporting material for each of your 10 points. Below each point, write the corps' perspectives in paragraph form (record its citation, too). Your paragraphs will be a draft so do not spend time perfecting your paragraphs at this point. Click on the flashlight.

Resources

 

DAY 6:

        1. Find the status of the treaties and record it. Click on the flashlight.
        2. Resources

        3. Polish your paragraphs as you type up your brief on the computer.

 

DAY 7:

        1. Polish your brief.
        2.  

        3. Review your brief and write down a minimum of 5 questions about the Arab-Israeli conflict you have as a result of your research.

Remember: you have a part of the big picture, so you will probably have questions. In step 3, the Bargaining Plan, these questions will be answered!

Please submit your brief at the end of class.

 

Return to Overview and Site Map

Return to List of Envoys

 

DIPLOMATS

MISSION

 

 

KIND OF BRIEF

Your brief will be written like a communiqué. A communiqué is an official statement from a diplomat that explains points of the corps' policy (a belief presented in a formal manner) concerning an issue.

 

 

EXAMPLE OF A COMMUNIQUÉ

Your brief should include 10 points of your corps' policy. The first point written should be the most important; the last should be the least important point. The 10 points should be the best 10 points that answer these key questions, according to your corps' view:

A separate paragraph explaining how the point of policy emerged or how it has changed should follow.

 

 

SPECIFICATIONS

        1. Each diplomat will submit a brief that will be unique from the other diplomats in your corps.
        2.  

        3. Use citations to indicate sources of information. Specifically, the title, date, and page number of sources must be typed like this:
        4. Example: (Wye Memorandum - 1995, p. 1). The citation should appear at the end of a sentence, before the period.

           

        5. On a separate page, attached to the back of your brief, type a list of 5 questions that you have as a result of your research.
        6.  

        7. Write your brief using formal language (void of contractions and emotion). Your brief should be 3 typed pages each double-spaced.

 

 

QUESTIONS?

Send me a note! Click here annkulp@redrose.net to e-mail me. Type your question and your name in the large window and then click on the send button at the top of the screen. I'll answer your questions and address your concerns as fast as possible. 

 

 

SCHEDULE: You have 7 days to complete your brief.

DAY 1, 2 & 3:

        1. Review the rubric for your brief. The rubric is a measurement of different levels of the quality of writing. Your brief will be assessed based on this rubric.
        2.  

        3. Read the resources. In fact, read them as fast as you can but be sure you can still comprehend what you are reading. As you read more resources, you will become comfortable with the language and begin to understand points that will be repetitive! Look for and write down each point that answers the key questions (record its citation, too.) Click on the flashlight.
        4. Resources

        5. Evaluate your list of points and limit it to 10 of the best answers to the key questions.

 

 

DAY 4 & 5:

Read the resources again. Look for supporting material for each of your 10 points. Below each point, write the corps' perspective in paragraph form (record its citation, too). Your paragraph will be a draft so do not spend time perfecting your paragraphs at this point. Click on the flashlight.

Resources

 

DAY 6:

        1. Find how the policy emerged or how it has changed and add paragraphs to your communiqué. You may be able to find this information only after you review all of your resources. Click on the flashlight.
        2. Resources

        3. Polish your paragraphs as you type up your brief on the computer.

 

 

DAY 7:

        1. Polish your brief.
        2.  

        3. Review your brief and write down a minimum of 5 questions about the Arab-Israeli conflict you may have as a result of your research.

Remember: you have a part of the big picture, so you will probably have questions. In step 3, the Bargaining Plan, these questions will be answered!

Please submit your brief at the end of class.

 

Return to Overview and Site Map

Return to List of Envoys

 

 

JOURNALISTS

MISSION

 

 

KIND OF BRIEF

Your brief will be written like an editorial. An editorial is an opinion written by the staff of a newspaper. It analyzes the strongest and most volatile perspectives of different groups and communicates the opinion of the newspaper. In this case, since you will be reviewing information from a few different resources, you will present the view of your corps. The example below shows the format and what should be written in each part of the format.

 

 

EXAMPLE FORMAT OF AN EDITORIAL

Your brief should include 10 perspectives from the different groups from your corps. The first perspective written should be the most important; the last should be the least important perspective. (You must determine which group's perspective is the most important.) The 10 perspectives should be the best 10 perspectives that answer these key questions, according to your corps' view:

A separate paragraph explaining how the perspective emerged or how it has changed should follow.

 

 

SPECIFICATIONS

        1. Each journalist will submit a brief that will be unique from the other journalists in your corps.
        2.  

        3. Use citations to indicate sources of information. Specifically, the title, date, and page number of sources must be typed like this:
        4. Example: (Wye Memorandum - 1995, p. 1). The citation should appear at the end of a sentence, before the period and within parentheses.

           

        5. On a separate page, attached to the back of your brief, type a list of 5 questions that you have as a result of your research.
        6.  

        7. Write your brief in a newspaper style (simple sentences answering how, who, what, when, where, and why. Your brief should be 3 typed pages each double-spaced.

 

 

QUESTIONS?

Send me a note! Click here annkulp@redrose.net to e-mail me. Type your question and your name in the large window and then click on the send button at the top of the screen. I'll answer your questions and address your concerns as fast as possible.

 

 

SCHEDULE: You have 7 days to complete your brief.

DAY 1, 2, & 3:

        1. Review the rubric for your brief. The rubric is a measurement of different levels of the quality of writing. Your brief will be assessed based on this rubric.
        2.  

        3. Read the resources. In fact, read them as fast as you can but be sure you can still comprehend what you are reading. As you read more resources, you will become comfortable with the language and begin to understand perspectives that will be repetitive! Look for and write down each perspective that answers the key questions (record its citation, too). Click on flashlight.
        4. Resources

        5. Evaluate your list of perspectives and limit it to 10 of the best answers to the key questions.

 

 

DAY 4 & 5:

Read the resources again. Look for supporting material for each of your 10 perspectives. Below each perspective, write the corps' perspectives in paragraph form (record its citation, too). Your paragraphs will be a draft so do not spend time perfecting your paragraphs at this point. Click on the flashlight.

Resources

 

DAY 6:

        1. Determine the tone of your editorial so that it matches your corps' perspectives. Tone is the attitude of writers conveyed by their choice of words, ideas, and the organization of their messages.
        2.  

        3. Polish your paragraphs as you type up your brief on the computer.

 

 

DAY 7:

        1. Polish your brief.
        2.  

        3. Review your brief and write down a minimum of 5 questions about the Arab-Israeli conflict you have as a result of your research.

Remember: you have a part of the big picture, so you will probably have questions. In step 3, the Bargaining Plan, these questions will be answered!

Please submit your brief at the end of class.

 

Return to Overview and Site Map

Return to List of Envoys

 

 

MILITARY TACTICIANS

MISSION

 

 

KIND OF BRIEF

Your brief will be written like a military strategic plan. A strategic plan lists the cause-and-effect of defensive and offensive actions. It also explains how the actions emerged or changed the situation for peace. The example below shows the format and what should be written in each part of the brief.

 

 

EXAMPLE OF A STRATEGIC PLAN

A separate paragraph should follow. The paragraph should provide specific examples of what has happened that forced the need for the actions (e.g. terrorist attacks) and an evaluation about how your corps' actions have changed the situation for peace.

 

 

SPECIFICATIONS

        1. Each military tactician will submit a brief that will be unique from the other military tacticians in your corps.
        2.  

        3. Use citations to indicate sources of information. Specifically, the title, date, and page number of sources must be typed like this:
        4. Example: (Wye Memorandum - 1995, p. 1). The citation should appear at the end of a sentence, before the period.

           

        5. On a separate page, attached to the back of your brief, type a list of 5 questions that you have as a result of your research.
        6.  

        7. Write your brief using a straightforward, neutral tone. Tone is the attitude of writers conveyed by their choice of words, ideas, and the organization of their messages. Your brief should be 3 typed pages each double-spaced.

 

 

QUESTIONS?

Send me a note! Click here annkulp@redrose.net to e-mail me. Type your question and your name in the large window and then click on the send button at the top of the screen. I'll answer your questions and address your concerns as fast as possible.

 

 

SCHEDULE: You have 7 days to complete your brief.

DAY 1, 2 & 3:

        1. Review the rubric for your brief. The rubric is a measurement of different levels of the quality of writing. Your brief will be assessed based on this rubric.
        2.  

        3. Read the resources. In fact, read them as fast as you can but be sure you can still comprehend what you are reading. As you read more resources, you will become comfortable with the language and begin to understand points that will be repetitive! Look for and write down each point that answers the key questions (record its citation, too.) Click on the flashlight.
        4. Resources

        5. Evaluate your list of actions and limit it to 10 of the best answers to the key questions.

 

 

DAY 4 & 5:

Read the resources again. Look for supporting material for each of your 10 actions. Below each action, write the corps' perspective in paragraph form (record its citation, too). Your paragraphs will be a draft so do not spend time perfecting your paragraphs at this point. Click on the flashlight.

Resources

 

DAY 6:

        1. Find specific examples of what has happened that forced the need for your corps' actions and determine how your corps' actions have changed the situation for peace. Click on the flashlight.
        2. Resources

        3. Polish your paragraphs as you type up your brief on the computer.

 

 

DAY 7:

        1. Polish your brief.
        2.  

        3. Review your brief and write down a minimum of 5 questions about the Arab-Israeli conflict you may have as a result of your research.

Remember: you have a part of the big picture, so you will probably have questions. In step 3, the Bargaining Plan, these questions will be answered!

Please submit your brief at the end of class.

 Go to step 3, Protocol.

 

Return to Overview and Site Map

Return to List of Envoys