Education

B.S. (Civil Engineering), Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 1985
M.S., Ph.D. (Civil Engineering/Applied Mechanics), University of Virginia, 1988 & 1993

Biographical Sketch

Professor Lissenden received a BSCE degree from Virginia Tech in 1985, where he emphasized structural engineering and participated in the cooperative education program.  He then worked as a structural engineer for an engineering consulting firm (Kimley-Horn & Associates) for two and a half years.  Subsequently, he attended the University of Virginia as a graduate student specializing in structural mechanics and received a MSCE degree in 1988.  After working on unique structural engineering problems for a consulting firm (Gee and Jenson) and becoming a registered structural engineer (Florida) he returned to the University of Virginia and obtained a Ph.D. in Civil Engineering/Applied Mechanics in 1993.  His dissertation, funded by the NASA Langley Research Center, was in the field of mechanics of composites and used a combined theoretical/experimental approach to study the inelastic response of metal matrix composites subjected to multiaxial loading.  As a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Engineering Mechanics at the University of Kentucky he continued research in solid and structural mechanics, advised graduate students, and taught mechanics courses.  In the summers of 1994 and 1995 he was awarded a NASA/ASEE summer faculty fellowship at the NASA Lewis Research Center (now known as the NASA Glenn Research Center) where he worked on the experimental determination of flow surfaces for metal matrix composites.  He joined the department of Engineering Science and Mechanics at Penn State in 1995, and is currently an Associate Professor of Engineering Science and Mechanics.  He was awarded a CAREER Award from the National Science Foundation in 1999 and has been awarded research grants from NASA Glenn Research Center.  He is currently serving as the Undergraduate Officer for the Engineering Science program.