Globalization and Minority Languages

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You might think that the pan-global economy and culture would be dangerous for minority languages, but here's an interesting article that claims that some speakers are looking back to their roots as a way to resist globalization.

http://icwales.icnetwork.co.uk/news/politics-news/2007/10/25/welsh-revival-may-be-a-reaction-to-globalisation-91466-20004034/

That is, the more the culture becomes "Standardized", the more people are looking for ways to create regional quirks, including resurrecting of regional languages like Welsh, Catalan and even Occitan, Walloon and Breton.

Even in the U.S. we see the development of new regional varieties such as a more pronounced versions of Great Lakes English, Canadian English, Hispanicized English and Californian/West Coast English. Given that the U.S. has been watching the same TV networks for 50 years now, this is unexpected.

I think there's something to this theory, because we are also seeing trends like regional foods cuisines (e.g. using regional ingredients) and an interest in indigenous crafts like knitting, woodworking and quilting.

I guess there are many ways to defy Gapification with both food and grammar.