« August 2007 | Main | October 2007 »

September 2007 Archives

September 4, 2007

Laryngeal Features & Clicks

The sounds from today's class were taken taken from these sites

http://www.personal.psu.edu/staff/e/j/ejp10/phon/consonants.html#laryngeal
- Quechua, Mazatec and others

The clicks can be found at
http://www.personal.psu.edu/staff/e/j/ejp10/phon/consonants.html#manner

Blogs Update

1) Initial blog entries are not due until next Thursday, but you must allow a THREE BUSINESS DAY turnaround to activate personal Web space.

Instructions on how to activate blog accounts are posted in ANGEL.

2)
* Your blogs are created at http://blogs.psu.edu
* Your blogs are posted to
http://www.personal.psu.edu/xyz123/blogs (xyz123 = Your Access ID)

3) Common Gotchas
* Click Rebuild to make blog visible.
* Set entries to Published to make each entry visible.
http://blogger.psu.edu/help/faqs#common


September 6, 2007

Updated Consonant Chart in ANGEL

I've posted a corrected version of the consonant symbol chart in ANGEL in the References folder. I will put up other materials there as needed.

Also - if you were looking for the survey after class and couldn't find it, it is now open again in the Week 1 folder.

Links to Sound Files for Vowels

I do have a page of links to different vowel symbols at
http://www.personal.psu.edu/ejp10/phon/vowels.html

These can be helpful for learning to recognize the different vowels.

September 12, 2007

Accents Site

The transcriptions we used in Tuesday's class on accents came from the Speech Accent Archive out of George Mason University
http://accent.gmu.edu/browse_atlas.php

September 13, 2007

Access Electronic Reserves from ANGEL

The material for today's class on acoustic phonetics was taken from the Ladefoged reading in Electronic Reserves.

To access the readings, do the following

1) Log in to ANGEL, then go to LING 404
2) Click the "Resources" tab.
3) Click the "Library Resources" link towards the right.
4) Click link for appropriate reading to download PDF file.

September 17, 2007

High School and Language Map

As promised, I inputted your high school data and your Adopt a Language into Google Maps. You can see the results at http://www.personal.psu.edu/ejp10/blogs/ling404fa07/maps.html

September 24, 2007

Extra Credit Opportunitty

This is (hopefully) an easy way to earn two extra points on the next assignment (#3).

Please go to https://protected.personal.psu.edu/e/j/ejp10/blogs/TEACH/ and watch the video for "Foux da fa fa".

Please include your comments on this blog. Please answer

1) If you were able to see the video or not.
2) If you saw the video, what lesson does it have for linguistics (hint: it has nothing to do with phonology).

September 25, 2007

Assignment 3 Tips

Based on questions that got asked after class, I thought I would share some hints.

0) General tips for phonological problems are in ANGEL in the Assignments folder.

1) Somali - It's a neutralization problem like Russian (end of Tuesday handout). I will say that there ARE near minimal pairs for /m/ and /n/ in Somali, so your analysis should reflect that.

2) Nasal Place Assimilation - Many languages require that nasals and following stops be of the same place of articulation. In a language like Spanish, an /m/ can only come before stops /p,b/ (all labial) and /n/ can only come before /t,d/ (all alveolar).

Spanish allows /mb,mp,nt,nd/ but does not allow */mt,md,np,nb/. Similarly, Spanish allows /ñč,ñǰ/ phonetically but there are no /ñp/ or /ñt/ words. Before a stop, all Spanish nasals must be the same place of articulation as a following stop.

On the other hand, between vowels, Spanish allows all three nasals as in this minimal triple - cama /kama/ 'bed', cana /kana/ 'gray haired.f', caña /kaña/ 'cane' (bot). Therefore the nasals /m,n,ñ/ are phonemic in Spanish even though there are restrictions before stop consonants.

English also has nasal place assimilation as a rule which is seen in variants such as in- (indiscreet, intolerabale) vs. im- as in impossible, imbalance.

The word impossible can be analyzed as in+possible 'not possible'. The underlying form in- 'not' was chosen based on forms like in-alienable, in-edible where the prefix comes before a vowel.

Class Blogs Added

I added a link to everyone's blogs at
http://www.personal.psu.edu/ejp10/blogs/ling404fa07/studentblogs.html

It's also in the left side "Key Links" section.

About September 2007

This page contains all entries posted to LING 404 Fall 2007 in September 2007. They are listed from oldest to newest.

August 2007 is the previous archive.

October 2007 is the next archive.

Many more can be found on the main index page or by looking through the archives.

Powered by
Movable Type 3.33