How Much Water Do You Waste in a Day?...

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I drink at least one bottle of water a day, how about you? I also shower about once a day and I'm sure most of us do. We don't think twice about having water to drink and wash ourselves with, but should we? One third of the world's population is living in countries that are experiencing water shortage. Even if those countries are not near to us that does not mean we could not help to reduce that water shortage for the countries that are experiencing it. One of the easiest environmental issues for us to help change is the water shortage; because there are little things for us to do that can have a huge impact. Every morning and night as we brush our teeth let's think about how much water we could save by turning off the faucet while we are not using the water. When we shower, is it really necessary to just stand in the water? If we get in the shower just to clean ourselves as we should we could cut back on the water that goes down the drain and maybe a child in Africa would get the chance to wash himself for once.  These are easy tasks for all of us to do, but maybe we cannot help the water shortage all on our own, so our next mission is to pass on the task to our friends and family. On average families of four people use 400 gallons of water every day. Think about how much water we could all save if all of our families took shorter showers and conserved water while brushing our teeth. The water we safe can help people are around the world in the countries that are suffering from the water shortage. Not only can we help the people that suffer the water shortage, but also our natural water ways and the animals that live in and benefit from these rivers and streams. The more water we save the more water can be left in the streams for the animals to use as well as the people who need clean water. The next time we brush our teeth and take a shower let's think about all the water we are saving and all the people and animals we are helping.  

References:

"Environmental Own Goals: Wasting Water." WWF. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Dec. 2012. <http://wwf.panda.org/about_our_earth/teacher_resources/own_goals/wasting_water/>.

"Conserving Water." American Rivers. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Dec. 2012. <http://www.americanrivers.org/take-action/other-ways/conserve/?gclid=CMjaw4X5l7QCFQ-e4AodDmYAbQ>.

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Water is critical to all forms of life and is taken for granted by people everywhere and everyday. Despite the fact that conservation methods such as using reusable water bottles and other sustainable practices are being implemented by more and more people everyday, it never hurts to continue spreading information regarding water conservation. It probably isn’t common knowledge that an average household spends seven hundred dollars per year on a sewer bill and letting a faucet run for five minutes uses as much as energy as leaving a sixty watt light bulb on for fourteen hours. By educating people with statistics such as these and other information regarding how much energy is wasted and how much money you can save a year by using simple conservation techniques, there is sure to be a higher incentive for many more people to join in the effort in becoming a more sustainable society. It is also extremely important to always be conscious of the fact that everything is interconnected. Just because the immediate effects of water waste and contamination are not evident, does not mean they are not affecting someone or something somewhere else.
“Water Sense” can help save water, energy, and money and will help keep the water where it should be which is in the lakes, rivers, and oceans. There are many sites and organizations that work to provide suggestions and services that can help anyone interested in reducing their impact do so. The Environmental Protection Agency and The Trust for Public Land’s websites both offer facts about the everyday waste of water and ways that one can help decrease their impact on the environment. Both of these sites also provide opportunities to donate time and money towards efforts to help protect wildlife, land, and ecosystems and play a vital role in securing a safe future for our planet.

http://www.tpl.org/research/land-water/

http://epa.gov/watersense/our_water/what_you_can_do.html

Water is critical to all forms of life and is taken for granted by people everywhere and everyday. Despite the fact that conservation methods such as using reusable water bottles and other sustainable practices are being implemented by more and more people everyday, it never hurts to continue spreading information regarding water conservation. It probably isn’t common knowledge that an average household spends seven hundred dollars per year on a sewer bill and letting a faucet run for five minutes uses as much as energy as leaving a sixty watt light bulb on for fourteen hours. By educating people with statistics such as these and other information regarding how much energy is wasted and how much money you can save a year by using simple conservation techniques, there is sure to be a higher incentive for many more people to join in the effort in becoming a more sustainable society. It is also extremely important to always be conscious of the fact that everything is interconnected. Just because the immediate effects of water waste and contamination are not evident, does not mean they are not affecting someone or something somewhere else.
“Water Sense” can help save water, energy, and money and will help keep the water where it should be which is in the lakes, rivers, and oceans. There are many sites and organizations that work to provide suggestions and services that can help anyone interested in reducing their impact do so. The Environmental Protection Agency and The Trust for Public Land’s websites both offer facts about the everyday waste of water and ways that one can help decrease their impact on the environment. Both of these sites also provide opportunities to donate time and money towards efforts to help protect wildlife, land, and ecosystems and play a vital role in securing a safe future for our planet.

http://epa.gov/watersense/our_water/what_you_can_do.html
http://www.tpl.org/research/land-water/

Water is critical to all forms of life and is taken for granted by people everywhere and everyday. Despite the fact that conservation methods such as using reusable water bottles and other sustainable practices are being implemented by more and more people everyday, it never hurts to continue spreading information regarding water conservation. It probably isn’t common knowledge that an average household spends seven hundred dollars per year on a sewer bill and letting a faucet run for five minutes uses as much as energy as leaving a sixty watt light bulb on for fourteen hours. By educating people with statistics such as these and other information regarding how much energy is wasted and how much money you can save a year by using simple conservation techniques, there is sure to be a higher incentive for many more people to join in the effort in becoming a more sustainable society. It is also extremely important to always be conscious of the fact that everything is interconnected. Just because the immediate effects of water waste and contamination are not evident, does not mean they are not affecting someone or something somewhere else.
“Water Sense” can help save water, energy, and money and will help keep the water where it should be which is in the lakes, rivers, and oceans. There are many sites and organizations that work to provide suggestions and services that can help anyone interested in reducing their impact do so. The Environmental Protection Agency and The Trust for Public Land’s websites both offer facts about the everyday waste of water and ways that one can help decrease their impact on the environment. Both of these sites also provide opportunities to donate time and money towards efforts to help protect wildlife, land, and ecosystems and play a vital role in securing a safe future for our planet.

http://epa.gov/watersense/our_water/what_you_can_do.html

http://www.tpl.org/research/land-water/

I never really realized just how valuable water is to people until I spent a week and a half in the Dominican Republic building houses after my junior year of high school. The only source of water those people really have is a weak running stream that cuts through the middle of their village. They wash themselves in it, they clean what little clothes they have in it, and they drink straight from it. They have no choice but to depend on this small source of water for everything they need. This water causes serious infections in small children and adults that they cannot afford to have cured. Whenever you see small children in third world countries with strangely round stomachs, this is not the result of food. They have parasites growing inside of them that make their stomachs appear round. They sacrifice themselves just to be able to quench their thirsts. We brought clean water with us and whenever we gave it to them they looked completely overjoyed just because we gave them clean drinking water. We can walk into a restaurant and get clean water for free. Poor people in third world countries cannot get it no matter how hard they try.

We need to find a better way to provide these poor communities with clean drinking water. I completely agree with you that it starts with us, we need to limit how much water we use when we shower, brush our teeth, or anything we do that ends with water going down a drain. I have taught myself to get in and out of the shower as quickly as possible in order to save water. Clean water is definitely something we take for granted and the needs to be changed.

Allison- I wrote a blog entry very similar to this. My blog entry focused on the implications of plastic bottles and not disposing of them properly. In my research, I found it very interesting how many natural resources are used to make the EMPTY plastic bottle itself. It takes about two hundred and seventy-two billion liters of water a year, worldwide to produce the empty bottles. It takes three to five liters of water to make just one plastic bottle. Most people don’t realize this or the fact that up to twenty four percent of bottled water is just filtered tap water. If that is the case, they might as well invest in a Brita filter! At least that way, they could save money, plastic and the water necessary to make the bottles themselves. Speaking of which, plastic bottles are an oil product. This is another natural resource that is wasted! I bet you also didn’t know that one hundred and fifty-one billion liters of oil are used to produce water bottles each year! That’s enough to run 500,000 cars per year. It takes 1.7 billion liters of oil just to transport and distribute the water bottles! These are all things that I learned while I researched my blog entry. It is fun to see how our articles almost go hand in hand. Anyway, nice article! I will be sure to think about the solutions you brought up next time that I am going to brush my teeth or shower. If you want to see where I learned some of the statistics I mentioned in this response, check out my blog entry about the plastic bottles and look at my references! ☺

I never really realized just how valuable water is to people until I spent a week and a half in the Dominican Republic building houses after my junior year of high school. The only source of water those people really have is a weak running stream that cuts through the middle of their village. They wash themselves in it, they clean what little clothes they have in it, and they drink straight from it. They have no choice but to depend on this small source of water for everything they need. This water causes serious infections in small children and adults that they cannot afford to have cured. Whenever you see small children in third world countries with strangely round stomachs, this is not the result of food. They have parasites growing inside of them that make their stomachs appear round. They sacrifice themselves just to be able to quench their thirsts. We brought clean water with us and whenever we gave it to them they looked completely overjoyed just because we gave them clean drinking water. We can walk into a restaurant and get clean water for free. Poor people in third world countries cannot get it no matter how hard they try.

We need to find a better way to provide these poor communities with clean drinking water. I completely agree with you that it starts with us, we need to limit how much water we use when we shower, brush our teeth, or anything we do that ends with water going down a drain. I have taught myself to get in and out of the shower as quickly as possible in order to save water. Clean water is definitely something we take for granted and the needs to be changed.

Allison-All three of my blogs discussed the water shortage, and how even though it may be a distant concern to us, it is a major crisis at the moment for others. I completely agree with your approaches for tackling this worldwide problem; it is truly up to us to change how we live our daily lives. The little things such as turning off the water when we aren’t using it, or taking shorter showers truly make a difference. One of the things I found extremely interesting during my research was that generally if you hand-wash your dishes, you are using up to at least twenty gallons of water. However, if you choose to use an energy star dishwasher, you are only using about four gallons (GOOD Magazine and Fogelson-Lubliner). That’s sixteen gallons of water saved just from using a dishwasher! I’m sure many families, including my own, who choose to hand wash are unaware of this fact! Which makes me consider how much water we could save if we choose to further educate ourselves on water conservation techniques. Just like you stated, through conservation, we can save the lives of both humans and animals that are currently dealing with this crisis. Making conservation an easy decision with multiple benefits for everyone around the world.


Bibliography
GOOD Magazine, and Fogelson-Lubliner. “GOOD Transparency: Water Conservation.” Youtube. Youtube, 22 Oct. 2009. Web. 14 Dec. 2012. .

I agree that we waste a ton of water. It is very easy to think of simple ways we can all conserve water more efficiently. Another possible way to conserve water would be to fill pitchers up with cold water and keep them in the fridge. That way every time you go to get a drink the water is not always running down the drain. Another simple thing we probably do not all do is to only run the dishwasher or clothes washer when you have a full load of dirty dishes or dirty clothes. It is also beneficial to not use the garbage disposal. Instead take the waste and put it in a compost. Then when your compost is full it can be used for top soil or other things. We would also be conserving water by not running the garbage disposal. I also suggest planting as much crops as you can in the fall. Rain is more plentiful in the fall and watering the plants would not be required as much. If you absolutely have to water your plants you could do that in the mornings or evenings when it is cooler. That way the water is not evaporating as much as it would in the warmer afternoon. Those are few other simple ways I have found to help us all conserve more water.

References:
http://wateruseitwisely.com/100-ways-to-conserve/

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