Brezová pod Bradlom
Genealogy, History, Culture


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  • A Short History of Brezová pod Bradlom, by Vera Seplak.

  • 1709:
    The 1709 census of Brezová lists people mainly by their names but only the important people get to be mentioned by their profession. Among them are:
    Jan and Juraj Placko....shoemakers
    Tomas Vevericka....kramar (small "shopkeeper" or "merchant")
    Jan Valko - baker
    Stefan Nespor- maker of spoons
    Martin Gavurnik- tar maker
    (from the book Brezová pod Bradlom; translation by Les Baraz, with additional help by Vlad Bzdusek)

  • The 1715 Census of Brezová pod Bradlom

  • The 1869 Census of Brezová pod Bradlom (165 KB)

  • 1885 map of Brezová pod Bradlom

  • Traditional clothing of Brezová pod Bradlom

  • Photos and paintings of Brezová pod Bradlom

  • The Lutheran church in Brezová pod Bradlom
    . . . Link to more church photos by Jim Hudnall
    . . . . . Jim writes: "Viera Mosna stayed with us for three weeks during an internship at
    . . . . . Grace Lutheran Church of Fort Washington, MD in 1996."
    . . . about the church (in Slovak)
    . . . Index (partial) to the church record book
    . . . Jay Webber's Slovak Lutheran History page

  • The Stefanik Memorial above Brezová pod Bradlom (1 photo)
    . . . a 1998 article from The Slovak Spectator on the Bradlo monument and Stefanik.

  • Emigration of Brezová residents to the United States, 1888-1910:

    • The very first Brezovan to emigrate to America was 24-year-old Samuel Sagat, a hat maker who settled in Yonkers, New York. He left shortly after he got married, in 1888, leaving his pregnant wife alone, claiming she was unfaithful to him. (not justified). He sent her money, though. He returned to Brezová 1 1/2 years later, told everybody about the good fortunes in America and on his way back he took with him a "whole bunch" of Brezovans. (No names mentioned). The Brezovans quickly nicknamed him Golumbus or Kolombus for obvious reasons.

      Another pioneer to leave for America in 1889 was Juraj Papanek who was also followed by others.

      It is estimated that in the period between 1893-1908 there were 1,500 Brezovans that left for America. (Ref: K. Culen's book A History of Slovaks in America)

      Brezovans in general did well in the new country, mainly because they were hard working and reliable. A lot of them worked in the leather processing industry, the trade they learned in Brezová (Garbiarstvo). Others worked in factories, opened small shops, farmed and one family, Papanek, even opened their own bank.

      There were in total 80 families that left and never returned. They were:

      From Baranec: Juric, Samuel, Ondris, Libo, Driensky, Kucera, Malenko, Golosinec, Samek, Cervenak, Trgala, Svatik, Kostelny.

      From Dolny Konec (Lower end): Makys, Pasmik (Placko), Valaska-Danko (Mudry), Babinec, Danko-Matusek, Juricek, Nosko (Mico), Krizko, Placko(Solar), Grek(Malenka), Cablk, Kostelny (Kolada), Gazo, Misar, Senkar.

      From Rinek(main square): Michalek (Juro), Nosko, Bozik, Bzduch, Danko(Krepkech), Kostelny, Papanek (Mesiac), Matuska, Tvarozek (po Samkovi)

      From Horny Konec(Upper end): Kundo, Kvaduch(Bednar), Maliarik, Zavodny, Viskup, Ondrla, Kopecek (Kos), Papanek (Martin-Strapaty), Vrabec, Melis, Seplak Matej, Jurza-Krajco, Kudel, Lesak Jur, Lesak Martin, Kadlecicka (Cupkova), Holic (Jurenak), Anna Reptova, Rechtoris, Kriha (Sas), Palko, Majercik.

      From Zavodie-Zahumnie: Makycs, Baroska (Tomas), Vician (Kyrisar), Katlovsky(krajcir-tailor), Kostelny (Tralo), Papankova (Kapustnicka), Rechtoris (Plenkar), Zavodny (Juris), Martin Danko (Krcho)

      From Zapivovar: Libo, Kubica, Vician

      All of the above is from the book Brezová pod Bradlom, pages 79 to 82, chapter titled "Brezovans Abroad" by Stefan Mosny, written in 1940. (translation by Les Baraz)

  • Other Brezová pod Bradlom links:

  • Genealogical researchers who have ancestors from Brezová pod Bradlom:


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