Sit Up Straight, Class.


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Body Posture Affects Confidence In Your Own Thoughts, Study Finds

My parents used to tell me all the time growing up, "Sit up straight, and keep your elbows off of the table." At one time or another, I am sure you have heard also to keep your back against the chair, and walk tall with a straight back. We have grown up thinking that people just want us to look like mature boys and girls with good posture, possibly. Well not only that, but studies have shown that maintaining good posture not only makes us look good, but also makes us feel good.

Good posture tends to make us feel more confident about ourselves, and in return we appear more confident to those around us. Ohio State University conducted a survey with 71 students in which some were told to maintain good posture, and some were told to maintain bad posture. As they observed the students, it was obvious that those who were told to use good posture were more honest and confident throughout the study. Another study showed that people had a more confident attitude when they were nodding as opposed to shaking their head side to side. Professional body language appears to signal positivism and confidence when demonstrated.

So as a college student I am well aware of how much easier it is to sit in a chair leaned back and all relaxed, but that may not be the type of image we want to give off. Also, we may lack confidence as a result of it. Future employers also tend to examine our body language, and make great judgment by the way we conduct ourselves. So, fortunately for us proper posture can be attained, and it could make all the difference to the connections we could be making. Sit up straight.

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5 Comments

Though good posture may be beneficial psychologically, there are physical ramifications that have recently come to light. Studies have shown that perfect posturing can actually hurt your back, and put a lot of strain on the disks in your spine. Slouching has been shown to alleviate the pressure, surprisingly enough. I suppose it comes down to whether or not you value the advantages you listed against the disadvantages that can be found in the following link: http://life.gaiam.com/article/dont-sit-straight-why-good-posture-bad-your-back

Having read through both of your articles, it sounds like standing straight and sitting straight might be two different things, in terms of some of the physical effects. Good standing posture is supposed to be beneficial because it balances the natural curvature of the spine (shown here: http://www.thehealthybackblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/posture-charts2.gif). There seems to be pretty solid evidence supporting this idea, but it seems like it's just assumed that the proper way to stand is also the proper way to sit. If people who sit with 'good posture' are ending up with their top half in a standing position while their lower half is in a sitting position, it's not surprising that this might not be ideal, since weight and pressure aren't distributed the same way when one sits as they are when one stands. I'm nowhere near an anatomist, so I might have just spewed a bunch of ignorant nonsense, but the possibility seemed worth considering.

My mother always tells me to sit up straight or I am going to have a lump in my back. I have noticed older people that have a lump in their back, and as a child I was so afraid I would look like that when I got older, so I began to listen to my mom. Sitting up straight is actually exercising your abdomen muscles which is why some people get lazy and just don't do it. http://haelthyinfo.blogspot.com/2012/09/sit-up-straight-to-burn-more-calories.html Check out this article on what else sitting up straight can do for you.

I completely understand where you're coming from! Sitting up and good posture is always something that my parents nagged me about but sometimes it is easier to just lounge and be more comfortable with bad posture. According to this article (http://backandneck.about.com/od/medication/tp/poorposture.htm), bad posture can be a multitude of things, and habit can be one because your muscles and bones will grow and form to fit your body. Back home, I work in a nursing home and I can see many residents whose backs are severely curved, and I have to wonder if having poor posture all of their lives has contributed to it. Good article!

I can completely relate to this blog! whenever I find myself slouching in my seat during class, I tend to get more sleepy or not pay as close attention to what my professors are saying. Another problem that I have run into is studying or doing my homework while sitting on my bed or sitting in an extremely comfortable chair! If I am too comfortable when I study, there is a high likelihood that I will fall asleep while studying. This would totally take a toll on my GPA. I read an article that said that good posture while you are studying can lead to better learning and you will have better memory retention. It also helps you deal with stress because , "simply adopting more dominant poses, people feel more powerful, in control and able to tolerate more distress. Out of the individuals studied, those who used the most dominant posture were able to comfortably handle more pain than those assigned a more neutral or submissive stance." (http://lifehacker.com/5821371/adopt-a-stronger-posture-to-make-experiences-less-stressful). Now I know that sitting up right in a chair in the library actually does help me study better!

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