Greek You-Go-Gurt


| 6 Comments

If you don't live under a rock or haven't been cryogenically frozen for the past three years, you would know what I'm talking about when I say that Greek yogurt has taken off and taken over the dairy universe. According to Ace Fitness, the Greek yogurt brand, Chobani, has been growing at more than 100% per year for the past three years. So why has this just so recently become in style?

First, let's look at the differences between Greek yogurt and regular yogurt. Greek yogurt is made from goat's milk and regular yogurt is made from cow's milk. Greek yogurt is generally thicker, and because of the fermenting process has a tangier taste. It is also higher in protein and lower in sugar. Both yogurts, however, have a lot of probiotics, which aid in boosting immunity and decreasing gastrointestinal symptoms.

chobani-greek-yogurt-1024x768.jpg

So why is everyone crazy over Greek yogurt if the difference is not that profound?

Well, it is marginally better for you in a few categories, but people really do enjoy its versatility. For example, Greek yogurt can be used as nearly seamless substitutes for sour cream, mayonnaise, or cream cheese in recipes and it is so much healthier for you. People enjoy it due to its health, convenience and taste.

The only downside is that as you get thinner, so does your wallet. It is a little more expensive but this is due to the more intensive fermenting process as compared to regular yogurt.

Looks like the answer to my question really isn't as compelling as I thought, but I would love to know what you guys think of Greek yogurt. I personally am not a fan. Do you guys like the tangy taste?


References:

http://www.fitday.com/fitness-articles/fitness/yogurt-smackdown-greek-vs-regular.html#b

http://www.acefitness.org/certifiednewsarticle/1550/the-truth-behind-the-greek-yogurt-craze/

http://health.usnews.com/health-news/diet-fitness/diet/articles/2011/09/30/greek-yogurt-vs-regular-yogurt-which-is-more-healthful

6 Comments

Greek Yogurt, especially Chobani, is one of my favorite meals for breakfast. It's quick, healthy, yummy, and filling. The first time I tried Greek yogurt is when I was a junior in high school and I though it was disgusting. Probably because I got the regular flavor. Once I started trying flavors like strawberry banana and peach, I realized that it actually tastes pretty good. Not only is it more healthy for you than regular yogurt but I have also realized that it keeps me full for a longer period of time because its thicker.

But I agree, it is pretty expensive. But in my opinion, it is definitely worth it. I like to be fit, so its the perfect breakfast to have before hitting the gym. But you have to acquire a taste for Greek yogurt, it isn't something that tastes good to everyone.

I find it so funny that at the end of your blog you said you're not a fan, because the way you started explaining Greek yogurt I would think that you are. I personally am not a fan of Greek yogurt either. It just does not look appealing to me because of how clumpy it looks. I had a taste of it one time, and vowed to never try it again. Recently, I found myself running back in the Greek yogurt direction, but this time for a completely different reason. I use it for my hair! Sounds crazy I know, but because its packed with lots of protein and the hair thrives off of moisture and protein, I learned that the plain type is great for the hair to do protein treatments!

I am personally not really a fan of yogurt at all; both greek and traditional. The main reason I have never really liked the food was because I did not like the consistency. However, after I tried Greek yogurt, the thicker consistency did not bother me as much as the thinner traditional type of yogurt. Is it the milk or the way that it is fermented that produces this thicker consistency?

I'm not too terribly fond of greek yogurt, but I am in love with the Ben and Jerry's Frozen Greek Yogurt. I don't know what the difference is between regular greek yogurt and the frozen kind, but what I do know is that I definitely would prefer the frozen kind over the non-frozen kind. The one burning question that I have about greek yogurt is this: Can probiotics be added to it, much like the Stonyfield Farms probiotic yogurts and smoothies? Or rather, are there greek yogurts out on the market that have been fortified with probiotics?

I guess it truly is about personal preference on this one. And Erica, yes it is actually both that is different. Greek yogurt comes from goat's milk instead of cow's like regular yogurt, and the fermenting process is done 4 times and uses much more milk to get the same amount of Greek yogurt as one process of regular yogurt.

Meghin, I have never heard of Ben and Jerry'sFrozen Greek Yogurt, but I am very intrigued! I love frozen yogurt (Kiwi is absolutely delicious, let's not lie here) and I'm sure I could learn to love frozen Greek yogurt too! If it is so much healthier, it's worth a shot.

To answer your question, I believe that the yogurt itself is full of probiotics naturally, and are not added to the yogurt. I think you certainly can add them (I believe Activia does that) but I think people lie the idea that it comes naturally and isn't synthetic in their food.

I just wanted to help clarify some of the facts you put in about greek yogurt. The majority of greek yogurt brands sold in the US use cow's milk just like regular yogurt. According to one of your sources the only difference is that it is strained three times instead of twice for that thicker consistency. I looked up some of the health benefits of greek yogurt vs. regular yogurt, and although greek yogurt has been viewed as a new "super food", there are a few downfalls. According to an article in US News, the straining process that greek yogurt goes through causes it to lose about a third of the calcium when compared to regular yogurt. Greek yogurt also has a lot more saturated fat and cholesterol than regular yogurt. Of course this can be avoided by eating a non-fat version, but 7 ounces normal full fat greek yogurt contains about 80% of the total daily allowance for saturated fat for a 2000 calorie diet.

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