Color Blindness


| 4 Comments
Many people find that color blindness is weird and hard to believe.  People with perfect vision, when it comes to color anyway, cannot really imagine what it is like to either mix-up colors or not see some colors completely.  As a victim of color blindness, I thought it would be good to blog about this.  Color blindness is caused by a problem with the color-sensing granules (pigments) in certain nerve cells in the eye.  These cells are found in the retina near the back of the eye.
2429.jpgIf just one pigment is missing, then people usually just have trouble telling red and green apart.  This type of color blindness is the most common.  If a different pigment is missing, then people usually have trouble telling apart blue and yellow, as well as having trouble with red and green.  The most severe type of color blindness is called achromatopsia and it is very rare.  Achromatopsia allows a person to only see colors as shades of grey.  This case of color blindness usually means that a person has very poor vision altogether. 

Color blindness is a genetic problem.  My dad is very badly color blind and that is why I am too.  One in ten men are diagnosed with color blindness and it is very rare for women to be color blind.  My dad and I both have a weird case of color blind though.  We find it hard to tell dark colors like purple, blue and dark green apart.  We see them as black.  We also find it hard to tell light colors like yellow, orange and pink apart.  We see those colors as white.  One symptom of color blindness is not being able to tell apart the difference between shades of the same or similar color.

People can find out if they are color blind by going to the doctor and getting an eye exam.  There is no known treatment for color blindness, however, there are special contact lenses and glasses that help people distinguish the difference between similar colors.  Color blindness is a lifelong condition but people that are color blind usually adjust to it without difficulty.  The only real complications with color blindness is the fact that you cannot acquire certain jobs.  For example, electricians, painters, costume designers, pilots and cooks need to see all colors accurately.

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As a kid with a severe case of color blindness, I found myself getting made fun of sometimes and other times people do not believe me.  Some people compare my vision to a dog's.  Lastly, a lot of questions are asked to tell the difference between certain colors, which I have trouble with.  Color blindness does not make me weird though, it makes me unique and I am proud of it.  Has anyone faced the problems that I have?

4 Comments

this is a very cool post. but, why is this condition rare for women? shouldn't the conditions be equal because of the anatomical structure of the human eye? or do women have less cones or do their retinae cover a less region of their eye? also, concerning Achromatopsia, is there any further research being developed about this and it is treatable?

That was a great question so I looked it up and since men only have one X Chromosome, it is more likely for it to be faulty and they will end up being color blind. Since women have two X Chromosomes it makes it less likely for them to become color blind. And so far scientists have cured Achromatopsia in mice by using a harmless virus but they have not tested it on humans so far, therefore, scientists have no clue whether or not it can cure for humans.

My dad suffers from color-blindness. He struggles with mostly blue and green. My mom has to sometimes help him pick out shirts and suits that match because he can't tell. Also, you're right, for someone who has good vision and does not suffer from color-blindness it is difficult to understand just what someone with it goes through. I've asked my dad on numerous occasions about it and obviously since he does not really know what normal vision sees he doesn't really know how to explain to me what he sees. However, my dad has super blue eyes and because of this his eyes are very very sensitive. I wonder if blue eyes could have an effect on color-blindness?

It's pretty funny that you say that because my dad and I also have blue eyes and as I said we both suffer from color-blindness. However, I have done research on that and there is no correlation between iris color and color-blindness. But that is a very good question, maybe something will be figured out in the future with more research.

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