My Computer Totally Gets Me


| 3 Comments

Most of us have probably cried when computers or ipods broke and were unable to be fixed. Okay maybe not cried, but have been pretty upset. We are afterall constantly using them for most or all aspects of our lives. If you're on a sports club team you get emails about practices and meetings, a THON committee requires you to check your email or facebook group often, and when it comes to classes, everything is digital.

So our computers have become like our children. We take care of them, spend a lot of time with them, buy fun toys for them to connect to. If we lost them, we might find ourselves lost until we replace them with newer, prettier ones.

For all the love we give our computers did you ever think they cared about us even a little bit? In a recently published article experts in the field of computer software and technology are trying to make computers engineered in a way to be able to assess our emotions by our facial and body expressions.

 

computers.jpg

For more than two decades the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has been working on a software that will read when a user is growing bored with the information they're learning or reading about. The computer will be able to tell if the user is annoyed, tired, confused, or unhappy with search results, information, or computer programming.

The idea for technology to be able to read users emotions wouldn't only be limited to computers.

Doctors have developed a prototype to help people with asperger's where they would wear special glasses that would warn them when people they are talking to are becoming bored with the conversation. Often people with asperger's cannot read when people are growing bored, uninterested, or irritated in a conversation. The glasses would have a yellow light flashing when they sense the person is uninterested or finished with the conversation.

GPS systerms are also being taken into account. The idea is to be able to assess when a driver using a GPS system is getting frustrated because the GPS is leading them into traffic jams or longer routes. The GPS system would be able to adjust their normally cheerful voice if they sense the driver is less than cheery.

The software has come a long way in the past couple of decades and we may see computers in schools as early as next school year that will be able to read a child's reaction to lessons, tests, and quizzes online.

This is all very futuristic stuff if you ask me. Although there are many advantages to this new technology, it may prove to be too invasive for some. What do you think? Is technology reading our emotions and reacting as a human being would too much to swallow in 2012?

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/10/16/science/affective-programming-grows-in-effort-to-read-faces.html?pagewanted=1&_r=0&ref=science

http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=computer+that+can+read+your+mind&view=detail&id=6B46E83BFDA48E24A18FA4850E57847FD707F1A9

3 Comments

I think this is way too much. Last blog period I talked about how people are in love with their iphones. We already rely on technology far too much, and relying on it to realize when we're bored and further entertain us is just pathetic.
Professors are constantly reminding us how poor our generation is at communicating with each other, and I don't think this will help one bit. Our addictions to technology are definitely crossing the line, and a piece of technology being able to detect our emotions sounds almost creepy.
I do think it makes sense with people with Asperger's, but wouldn't it make more sense to take the time to teach those with Asperger's the social signals of when someone is becoming bored or irritated? I don't know enough about Asperger's to know whether or not this is reasonable, but it seems to me that this technology seems to be unnecessary.

I agree that we are way too dependent on technology, to a point where it disconnects us from everyday life. Yes, I am guilty as being one of those people, but in this day and age technology is just the norm. Technology is moving at such a fast pace; the question is whether we should indulge in these advances or take a step back and slow the high speed process down? While a computer being able to detect our emotions sounds really cool, it also seems just as unnecessary. How would this benefit us, computers cannot console us or share our happiness.

With newer advances in technology, people are more likely to be having more “screen time.” Screen time constitutes computers, TV’s, game boys, phones, etc. Technology might be moving too fast for our own good.

Our brains are elastic; they constantly grow and develop. They can adapt to positive/ negative things and even learn and re-learn things. New studies show that computers could be bad for our brains because they do not allow our brain to re-learn things by itself. Instead, the computer does it for you. For example, if you spell a word wrong and spell check suggests a new spelling for it. Most people automatically click the suggested spelling just because the way they spelled it was underlined in red. But they do not actually take the time to read, process, and re-learn how to spell that word.

According to Oxford Learning, computers can also be bad because “Our brains can become addicted to the fast-paced, instantaneous give-and-take of the high-speed, connected, online world.” When using a computer, we usually have so many windows open that it causes our brain to multi-task thus leading to difficulties in recognizing when to filter out unimportant information. This is surprising to hear because before reading this, I would have thought the opposite. I would think that multi-tasking is good for the brain because it trains our brain to become more efficient and process even more! Interesting that my thoughts are completely opposite to what the article said….what do you guys think?

Then this article lead me to a New York Timesarticle, which provided another example that contradicted my thoughts and supported what Oxford Learning said. The example was about a man who had received an e-mail that a company wanted to buy his Internet start-up. However, there were so many e-mails and other things open on his computer that he completely missed the e-mail! I now understand why they said that multi-tasking on a computer is negative for the brain. His brain did not realize he received such an important e-mail because there were so many other distractions. He could not filter the unimportant information. The situation would have been different had he received a single letter in the mail…he would have never missed that because it came individually.

The stimulation of having everything so readily available on the internet causes the brain to release a dopamine squirt that can apparently become addictive. I read about how people have died in several countries in Asia because they stay at 24/7 computer game cafes. They become so addicted and mentally in the game that they stay there for days; not eating, sleeping, or leaving the screen. Can problems like this be blamed on people or technology?

I agree that we are way too dependent on technology, to a point where it disconnects us from everyday life. Yes, I am guilty as being one of those people, but in this day and age technology is just the norm. Technology is moving at such a fast pace; the question is whether we should indulge in these advances or take a step back and slow the high speed process down? While a computer being able to detect our emotions sounds really cool, it also seems just as unnecessary. How would this benefit us, computers cannot console us or share our happiness.

With newer advances in technology, people are more likely to be having more “screen time.” Screen time constitutes computers, TV’s, game boys, phones, etc. Technology might be moving too fast for our own good.

Our brains are elastic; they constantly grow and develop. They can adapt to positive/ negative things and even learn and re-learn things. New studies show that computers could be bad for our brains because they do not allow our brain to re-learn things by itself. Instead, the computer does it for you. For example, if you spell a word wrong and spell check suggests a new spelling for it. Most people automatically click the suggested spelling just because the way they spelled it was underlined in red. But they do not actually take the time to read, process, and re-learn how to spell that word.

According to Oxford Learning, computers can also be bad because “Our brains can become addicted to the fast-paced, instantaneous give-and-take of the high-speed, connected, online world.” When using a computer, we usually have so many windows open that it causes our brain to multi-task thus leading to difficulties in recognizing when to filter out unimportant information. This is surprising to hear because before reading this, I would have thought the opposite. I would think that multi-tasking is good for the brain because it trains our brain to become more efficient and process even more! Interesting that my thoughts are completely opposite to what the article said….what do you guys think?

Then this article lead me to a New York Timesarticle, which provided another example that contradicted my thoughts and supported what Oxford Learning said. The example was about a man who had received an e-mail that a company wanted to buy his Internet start-up. However, there were so many e-mails and other things open on his computer that he completely missed the e-mail! I now understand why they said that multi-tasking on a computer is negative for the brain. His brain did not realize he received such an important e-mail because there were so many other distractions. He could not filter the unimportant information. The situation would have been different had he received a single letter in the mail…he would have never missed that because it came individually.

The stimulation of having everything so readily available on the internet causes the brain to release a dopamine squirt that can apparently become addictive. I read about how people have died in several countries in Asia because they stay at 24/7 computer game cafes. They become so addicted and mentally in the game that they stay there for days; not eating, sleeping, or leaving the screen. Can problems like this be blamed on people or technology?

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