How to eat a triceratops.


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How would you eat a triceratops? Well, if you are smart, you would down this dinosaur like a Tyrannosaurus Rex. That is, of course, if you are also 40 feet long with four foot jaws filled with teeth the size of your notebook. But, since I'm pretty sure none of us meet this criteria (thank goodness!), let's see why the Tyrannosauras Rex is applauded for its smart eating habits.

The Tyrannosauras Rex, being the fierest known dinosaur, has recently been discovered to be quite intelligent, as well. Denver Fowler, from the Museum of the Rockies in Montana, recently spent a great deal of time examining numerous triceratop specimans, a favorite meal of the Tyrannosauras Rex.

t_rex_skull_photo.jpg

Fowler and his colleagues were quite surprised by what they discovered on the skull and neck bones of the Triceratops. They examined 18 sets of Triceratop bones only to find that many of the bone sets had deep skull bite marks with no sign of healing, which indicated these were fatal bites. This finding caused confusion. Why would the Tyrannosauras Rex focus such a great deal on the area of their prey that had the least amount of meat?

As they farther examined the bite marks on the skulls, they also discovered major puncture wounds and pull marks on the necks. After reviewing and replaying over and over again how these marks could of been created, they came up with an answer. The bite marks on thefdafdasfda.jpg skull and the pull marks on the neck were indications that the Tyrannosauras Rex was routinely decapitating his prey, more than likely to get to the meaty muscles inside the neck.

It is great to think about how smart animals can actually be and how they evolve to better suit their needs. Although, I'm quite glad this particular creature is no longer with us. For being known as having a small brain and a lack of intelligence, Tyrannosauras Rex seemed awfully smart.  

 

Works Cited:

Matt Kaplan, How to eat a Triceratops, nature, October 24, 2012

http://www.nature.com/news/how-to-eat-a-triceratops-1.11650

 

Matthew Steiner, Tyrannosauras Rex, Dinosaur Tiime Machine, 2008

http://www.mantyweb.com/dinosaur/t-rex.htm

 

2 Comments

This post has changed everything I knew about the fabled T Rex.I always thought they were a dumb animal because their brain was notoriously small. I could never imagine an animal that couldn't see if people didn't move. The idea that this animal could be an apex predator and intelligent makes you think how it could become extinct. It could also go to help prove that animals did learn from each other because over time the T ex probably learned it was better to decapitate the prey rather than chance them still being alive and possible run away and possibly come back and kill that T Rex. Is it possible that this could be learned from some other animals as well,which would show that they learned.

What caught my eye about this post was the title. I expected to start reading about how scientists brought back a triceratops and was using it as an alternative meat source.

However, once I started reading the post, I became very intrigued. I never knew that the ferocious T-Rex was a smart predator...one that figured out how to decapitate its prey. I guess having tiny arms might've been a huge disadvantage, but having those powerful jaws made up for it!

Are there any other dinosaurs that did anything nearly as dangerously smart as the T-Rex, or is there still ongoing research? Did parents of baby T-Rexes teach them how to decapitate their prey as well?

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