Can I catch a cold from being underdressed?


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Can you catch a cold from being cold?

Growing up many time I have heard "Button up or jacket you going to catch a cold "or " Cover up your neck before you get a cold " I never really understood how you could get a cold from being cold but I did what I was told . This is a question that I still wonder what the answer is and it has inspired me to research the answer

How do you catch a cold? http://www.drmirkin.com/morehealth/9941.html

A cold is caused by an infection to your immune system. Infection is caused by germs that get into your body from close contact from people who are sick. For instance, you when other person who sneeze or cough in your face or transmit germs with their hands to objects that you touch. Research shows that the most common way to get a cold is from someone who has a cold, sneezes on his hands, and then shakes yours.  Another way you can also get a cold when a person blows his nose or coughs into a handkerchief and gets some of the germs on his hands, then touches a door knob, and hours later, you touch the door knob and put your fingers in your nose. A way to prevent the common cold is to wash your hands often and spray Lysol.

But why is that more people get colds in the winter?

One belief is that more people catch cold in the winter because everyone is in school and you are surrounded by more people who have the cold all the day. As in the summer time you are surrounded by less people and for different times

Another belief is that our amount of Vitamin D is lower because our skin isn't receiving the same amount of sunlight as it was in the summer. Therefore resulting in our bodies being more prone to illnesseshttp://wiki.answers.com/Q/Can_you_catch_a_cold_from_being_in_the_cold

Why do you believe that we catch more colds in the winter time?

5 Comments

This is so interesting! Even now my parents say "wear your jacket, blah blah blah" as if I were 8 years old. I did some more research on the topic and this article explains that there is a perceived correlation between climate and sickness for a few reasons. The number one reason being that cold weather restricts people to the indoors where infections and viruses spread on surfaces much more easily than outdoors. Think about it, in the winter you're barely outside, the only times you're really outdoors is where your traveling from indoor place to indoor place (the places where the sicknesses are actually contracted). Also, "barometric pressure or winds with airborne pollutants" can cause breathing problems and a running nose, but are not at all associated with infectious sicknesses that people have come to believe are triggered by the weather.

Hi Shelby,
I found this blog to be interesting because my mom has always told me that in the winter you can get colds easier from being cold. However, I found another website that supports your point that it's not actually being cold that makes you sick. This website says that it could be due to the fact that the membrane in your nose gets dried out, the virus is more stable in cold, dry climates, or the fact that droplets of the virus remain airborne for longer periods of time.

http://infectiousdiseases.about.com/od/respiratoryinfections/a/winter_virus.htm

My parents used to always also tell me to bundle up and cover my neck if I don’t want to get sick. Honestly, it seems to work. I dress very warmly in the winter and have a pretty good immune system because I rarely got sick. My brother on the other hand who walked out in T-shirts in the winter always got sick. I know that this goes against your point that the cold does not actually make you cold, but it is funny that so many people hold this misconception, even if personal anecdotes prove the misconception true.
It is called a common cold after all, because so many people catch it in their lifetime. The difference is the severity of the cold; some face their worst experiences while others get over it carelessly in days. ">Net Doctor taught me that, “There are more than 100 different viruses that can result in a cold.” The only difference between these viruses are the strains, however the general symptoms and affects are the same. These viruses move from person to person all year round. I wonder if people living in different countries also catch the common cold mostly in the winter, or another season. After all, the season has nothing to do with it. The point you make about more people being crowded in closer vicinity during winter is one I would have never thought about. It sounds very logical.
Whenever I clearly have to blow my nose and constantly sniff it back up, someone in my family hands me a tissue and says it is bad to keep sniffing it back. I never really gave much thought to this either; sometimes it was just easier to keep sniffing than actually grab a tissue! However, I now blow my nose because I realize the more I keep sniffing back up the mucus, the more it will build up in my nose. This could cause the mucus to stay in your system even longer, keeping you sick even longer. The comments regarding the color of mucus also hold to be true. Every time I go to the doctor when I am sick, they ask me what color my mucus is. Another misconception I found the truth to: “Green snot is no more or less likely to signal a bacterial or viral infection,” according to
The New York Times.

My parents used to always also tell me to bundle up and cover my neck if I don’t want to get sick. Honestly, it seems to work. I dress very warmly in the winter and have a pretty good immune system because I rarely got sick. My brother on the other hand who walked out in T-shirts in the winter always got sick. I know that this goes against your point that the cold does not actually make you cold, but it is funny that so many people hold this misconception, even if personal anecdotes prove the misconception true.
It is called a common cold after all, because so many people catch it in their lifetime. The difference is the severity of the cold; some face their worst experiences while others get over it carelessly in days. Net Doctor taught me that, “There are more than 100 different viruses that can result in a cold.” The only difference between these viruses are the strains, however the general symptoms and affects are the same. These viruses move from person to person all year round. I wonder if people living in different countries also catch the common cold mostly in the winter, or another season. After all, the season has nothing to do with it. The point you make about more people being crowded in closer vicinity during winter is one I would have never thought about. It sounds very logical.

Whenever I clearly have to blow my nose and constantly sniff it back up, someone in my family hands me a tissue and says it is bad to keep sniffing it back. I never really gave much thought to this either; sometimes it was just easier to keep sniffing than actually grab a tissue! However, I now blow my nose because I realize the more I keep sniffing back up the mucus, the more it will build up in my nose. This could cause the mucus to stay in your system even longer, keeping you sick even longer. The comments regarding the color of mucus also hold to be true. Every time I go to the doctor when I am sick, they ask me what color my mucus is. Another misconception I found the truth to: “Green snot is no more or less likely to signal a bacterial or viral infection,” according to The New York Times.

This blog is very interesting because I never thought about how you really catch a cold so logically. I have also heard just like everyone else that you need to bundle up before you catch a cold. This blog is basically saying that you can’t even catch a cold from being cold so that saying is false. But if you do stand outside in the cold without enough clothing you will get sick. But is that not a cold? Now I am confused.
I also think people catch more colds in the winter because of the confinement. Even though in the summer time people are out more and you’re around a lot more people, I think the confinement of the winter is an easier place for germs to spread. The low humidity of the winter also helps to keep the germs alive.

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