Alcoholism..


| 4 Comments
Alcohol is a very powerful drug. It's an antidepressant that slows down your reaction time and effects your brain and spinal cord activity. When consuming alcohol, it travels through out your whole body through your blood stream. What causes you to be intoxicated, or "drunk," is when the alcohol reaches your brain and knocks out your control centers. 

So is alcoholism a disease???
It's difficult for many people to think of alcoholism as a "real disease." We commonly think of a disease as something wrong with your body or mind, that happens by chance. Alcoholism is hard to think of as a disease because people choose to drink the alcohol, it's not some tragic health problem that they just wakeup with one day. However, alcoholism IS a disease. Medical professionals have referred to alcoholism as a chronic and sometimes fatal disease. Alcoholism is considered a disease and defined "as a mental obsession that causes a physical compulsion to drink." A mental obsession is something you have NO CONTROL over. Your mind cause your body to crave and depend on something, in this case alcohol. The mental obsession causes a physical compulsion to drink, and continue drinking until they are satisfied.

Is alcoholism genetic???
This is a question currently trying to be proved. Many doctors and medical professionals believe alcoholism is inherited, but the actual gene has not been identified yet. Evidence proving that alcoholism IS inherited is growing. For example "Children of alcoholics are four times more likely than other children to become alcoholics, according to the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry." However, there is always the outside factors that could be to blame for these statistics like the upbringing of the child instead of an actual gene they received. However; there has been studies that suggest it's not due to outside factors but instead it is genetic. In Sweden, they studied twins who were adopted as children and separated from each other (separated from their twin also.) Studies showed that alcoholism was DRAMATICALLY more present among children whose fathers were alcoholics, regardless of if they grew up around alcoholism or not. The Swedish scientists who conducted this experiment, hypothesized that the DRD2 gene is linked to alcoholism, which may be true but isn't proven 100% yet. 

Hopefully soon more information about alcoholism will be found, and eventually a cure!
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4 Comments

We are all college students so it'd be dumb to suggest not drinking at all. Most of us do it on a weekly basis. But does it occur to everyone that so many families and so many people's lives are ruined by alcohol? Drunk driving, abusive family members, and liver cancer are just naming a few. If this is the case, and what we have read above is accurate, why are all these alcohol companies finding ways to sell us more and more alcohol. From the infamous four lokos, to alcoholic-arnold palmers it doesn't stop. Apparently this being in an issue isn't as important as the money made off of it. Have you seen anything positive that comes from consuming alcohol?
Wine is often thought of as the safe form of alcohol.
Wine

Everyone in college comes from different backgrounds, and I feel that some are probably not aware of how careful they should be. While I agree that it would be dumb to suggest not drinking at all, I feel that how a college student acts in college can also be dependent on how they were raised, and taught about alcohol from their parents.

This made me think about how much we as college students drink. You don't normally think of college students as alcoholics, but I'm sure some students at penn state are. Can we not classify a person as an alcoholic until they are older? Or do we as a society just let alcoholism in young adults slide because we are in college and kids in college tend to drink more than they ever have before?

I have recently have been talking about this subject with my friends as well. Can the binge drinking that occurs in college be considering alcoholism? Whether it can or not, college students often times don’t realize when their drinking becomes habitual because it is simply the “norm.” I agree that how people handle their alcohol has a lot to do with their upbringing. From my experiences, people who have been exposed to alcohol in their high school years know their limits and how to handle their alcohol. On the other hand, people who never drank in high school and all of a sudden started drinking in college do not always know their limits yet, so they overdo it.

In a 2009 a study was done by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). They found that 14.9% of eighth graders, 30.4% of tenth graders, and 43.5% of twelfth graders admitted to drinking alcohol in the past 30 days.” According to Science Net Links , a person becomes addicted to alcohol when they become so used to the alcohol that their brain needs it to function.

On this website, I also found many useful questions that I think a lot of people would find helpful. People our age often over drink because we do not directly feel the results, therefore, we underestimate how alcohol affects our bodies.
What are some of the first effects of drinking alcohol?
-As many of you probably know, alcohol decreases ones inhibitions making that person more relaxed and sociable.
Why do people black out or forgot what happened after excessively drinking?
-Alcohol affects the brains ability to remember.
-Why do people pass out after drinking?
People can pass out when a part of the brainstem called Reticular Activating System reaches too high of a level. The RAS is a part of your brain that controls whether someone is awake or asleep. Interestingly enough, different parts of your brain need different amounts of alcohol to be affected. Some parts need just a bit of alcohol to become impaired, while other parts need higher amounts. Alcohol also affects the liver and heart.

NIH Senior Health did studies to compare how alcohol affects men and woman differently. They found that in general men drink more alcohol than woman do, woman’s bodies are more easily affected by alcohol than men’s are, and that woman break down alcohol slower in their bodies. Women are more likely to get drunk faster than males also because their bodies retain less water which makes the alcohol even more concentrated. Next time you go out to drink, try to count how many drinks you have that night!

I have recently have been talking about this subject with my friends as well. Can the binge drinking that occurs in college be considering alcoholism? Whether it can or not, college students often times don’t realize when their drinking becomes habitual because it is simply the “norm.” I agree that how people handle their alcohol has a lot to do with their upbringing. From my experiences, people who have been exposed to alcohol in their high school years know their limits and how to handle their alcohol. On the other hand, people who never drank in high school and all of a sudden started drinking in college do not always know their limits yet, so they overdo it.

In a 2009 a study was done by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). They found that 14.9% of eighth graders, 30.4% of tenth graders, and 43.5% of twelfth graders admitted to drinking alcohol in the past 30 days.” According to Science Net Links , a person becomes addicted to alcohol when they become so used to the alcohol that their brain needs it to function.

On this website, I also found many useful questions that I think a lot of people would find helpful. People our age often over drink because we do not directly feel the results, therefore, we underestimate how alcohol affects our bodies.
What are some of the first effects of drinking alcohol?
-As many of you probably know, alcohol decreases ones inhibitions making that person more relaxed and sociable.
Why do people black out or forgot what happened after excessively drinking?
-Alcohol affects the brains ability to remember.
-Why do people pass out after drinking?
People can pass out when a part of the brainstem called Reticular Activating System reaches too high of a level. The RAS is a part of your brain that controls whether someone is awake or asleep. Interestingly enough, different parts of your brain need different amounts of alcohol to be affected. Some parts need just a bit of alcohol to become impaired, while other parts need higher amounts. Alcohol also affects the liver and heart.

NIH Senior Health did studies to compare how alcohol affects men and woman differently. They found that in general men drink more alcohol than woman do, woman’s bodies are more easily affected by alcohol than men’s are, and that woman break down alcohol slower in their bodies. Women are more likely to get drunk faster than males also because their bodies retain less water which makes the alcohol even more concentrated. Next time you go out to drink, try to count how many drinks you have that night!

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