What Happens When We Don't Get Enough Sleep?


| 4 Comments
If I asked you, "Do college kids get enough sleep?" Everyone would respond, "Of course not!" It's a wide known fact that we aren't sleeping enough, but how does our lack of sleep hurt us?

Through research, I learned that lack of sleep can be detrimental to a student's everyday academic performance. Being sleep deprived can also be related to depression and other behavioral problems.

I also thought it was interested that a study published in the Journal of American College Health that one third of the students interviewed claimed that it took them at least 30 minutes to fall asleep each night. Additionally, 43 percent of those interviewed said they wake up more than once each night. I found this very compelling, because I have similar problems.

The article suggests going to bed and waking up around the same time every day (including the weekends) so you don't disrupt your circadian rhythm, which is the 24 hour cycle that allows you to sleep well. 

Another article revealed that only 11 percent of American college students sleep well, while "40 percent of students feel well rested only two days per week."

The article, written by Dr. Robert Stickgold claims that, "Inadequate sleep appears to affect the brain's ability to consolidate both factual information and procedural memories about how to do various tasks."


4 Comments

These past few weeks since school has started, I have felt exhausted constantly. I will admit- I do it to myself, but it is almost as if it has become part of my everyday life. Staying up late every night, regardless of what time I have class in the morning. I am a night person, which defenitely has something to do with it, but this excuse does not make up for what I am doing to my body.
I can feel my body is exhausted. I can feel myself dragging on through the day when my eyes start drifting in that mid-afternoon part of the day. Normally on week days, I go to bed around 2 AM and the weekends depend on how the night is coming along. According to The National Sleep Foundation, the following age groups needs approximately this many hours of sleep each night.

Newborns (0-2 months): 12-18 hours
Infants (3-11 months): 14-15 hours
Toddlers (1-3 years old): 12-14 hours
Preschoolers (3-5 years old): 11-13 hours
School age children (5-10 years old): 10-11 hours
Teens (10-17 years old): 8.5-9.25 hours
Adults: 7-9 hours

We are all adults here! I know some nights I do get a good 7-9 hours of sleep in, and the next day I still find myself tired. If I read further into the article on the National Sleep Foundation, I found out that although these numbers are standard, there is no "magic number." Everyone is different. People's necessity to sleep depends on their individual body. I guess my magical number is not 7,8,or 9 hours.

Students often resort to energy drinks to boost them up to last the rest of the day. Reading upon Natural Health Techniques, I found a list of numerous energy drinks on the market today. Among the most popular are Red Bull, Rockstar, Full Throttle, and Monster. Even the names are scary; They sound like the names of drugs. That is because they are drugs! Caffeine is a drug that many people do not even realize they are addicted to. According to the Australian Drug Foundation, caffeine is the most widely used drug in the world. It is a stimulant that makes your central nervous system speed up its reactions, which is why we feel a boost of energy when we intake caffeine. But what many people do not know is that caffeine has negative side effects such as headaches, anxiety, stomach pains and dehydration.

So next time you stay up late to watch tv, think about if sleeping during that time could instead allow you to have a more productive following day.

These past few weeks since school has started, I have felt exhausted constantly. I will admit- I do it to myself, but it is almost as if it has become part of my everyday life. Staying up late every night, regardless of what time I have class in the morning. I am a night person, which defenitely has something to do with it, but this excuse does not make up for what I am doing to my body.
I can feel my body is exhausted. I can feel myself dragging on through the day when my eyes start drifting in that mid-afternoon part of the day. Normally on week days, I go to bed around 2 AM and the weekends depend on how the night is coming along. According to The National Sleep Foundation, the following age groups needs approximately this many hours of sleep each night.

Newborns (0-2 months): 12-18 hours
Infants (3-11 months): 14-15 hours
Toddlers (1-3 years old): 12-14 hours
Preschoolers (3-5 years old): 11-13 hours
School age children (5-10 years old): 10-11 hours
Teens (10-17 years old): 8.5-9.25 hours
Adults: 7-9 hours

We are all adults here! I know some nights I do get a good 7-9 hours of sleep in, and the next day I still find myself tired. If I read further into the article on the National Sleep Foundation, I found out that although these numbers are standard, there is no "magic number." Everyone is different. People's necessity to sleep depends on their individual body. I guess my magical number is not 7,8,or 9 hours.

Students often resort to energy drinks to boost them up to last the rest of the day. Reading upon Natural Health Techniques, I found a list of numerous energy drinks on the market today. Among the most popular are Red Bull, Rockstar, Full Throttle, and Monster. Even the names are scary; They sound like the names of drugs. That is because they are drugs! Caffeine is a drug that many people do not even realize they are addicted to. According to the Australian Drug Foundation, caffeine is the most widely used drug in the world. It is a stimulant that makes your central nervous system speed up its reactions, which is why we feel a boost of energy when we intake caffeine. But what many people do not know is that caffeine has negative side effects such as headaches, anxiety, stomach pains and dehydration.

So next time you stay up late to watch tv, think about if sleeping during that time could instead allow you to have a more productive following day.

I think the problem is not as much a lack of sleep as the quality of sleep college kids are getting. Most of us are very stimulated throughout the day, and everyone I know (including myself) has a hard time pulling away from a screen of some sort. Couple that with trying to sleep in a dorm full of sounds with a roommate coming in and out (mine: nightly at 3am, sometimes again at 5am), and it's hard to get enough deep, REM-filled sleep I think. This study reached a similar conclusion that quality should be focused on just as much as quantity.

I definitely agree with the fact that the majority of college students do not get enough sleep, but I feel like there is a lot of students who just believe that they are not getting enough sleep because they do not feel good in the morning maybe based on other facts such as drinking habits.

I see how many students would have trouble sleeping mainly do to the living conditions. When looking at our student housing living conditions they are not exactly the most healthy thing for our health. For example, East Halls, if you have ever lived in east everyone is jam packed into rooms, floors, and buildings that should definitely not hold as many students as they do. The evidence behind that is that everyone is sick we are living so close together that every move me make and everything we do effects the people around us, especially their health.

Getting back to sleeping habits I do agree that consistent sleeping habits will help all students health. I personally would suggest having a class every day starting at the same time for me it is FR 111 at 10:10 everyday.

Leave a comment

Subscribe to receive notifications of follow up comments via email.
We are processing your request. If you don't see any confirmation within 30 seconds, please reload your page.

Search This Blog

Full Text  Tag

Recent Entries

Alcohol and Energy Drinks
We've all heard of Four Lokos (or "blackout in a can") and the drama surrounding them when they first came…
It isn't up to the Keratin
Many girls who have naturally curly, wavy, or frizzy hair have started looking into getting keratin treatments at their local…
It isn't up to the Keratin
Many girls who have naturally curly, wavy, or frizzy hair have started looking into getting keratin treatments at their local…

Old Contributions