Slow Down!


| 6 Comments
A blog post a couple down from me got me wondering... Is it really that big of a problem that Americans eat fast?  After doing some research, I found that the rapid pace that Americans consume food is a huge cause of obesity.  This was a shock to me, especially coming from a family of fast eaters.  My mom always tells us all to slow down, but of course nobody listens, especially my brother and dad!  Maybe we all should listen to her though.  It takes about 20 minutes for your brain to tell you that your stomach is full, so in this 20 minutes people consume a lot more food than they need to in order to be full.  People who eat slowly eat a lot less food because they realize they are full before they eat too much.  Hormones need to travel all the way from your gut to your brain and then give your brain feedback on how satisfied you are.  Then, "stretch receptors in the stomach must indicate that it's nearing capacity.  But food takes a little time to reach the stomach, and the stretch receptors can be slow to react."   (Taken from an article in Oprah  Magazine).  So, people who eat a lot in a short amount of time will not realize that they are too full until they have already overeaten.  A study  done asking 3,300 people about their eating habits showed that people who said they ate quickly and until they felt full were THREE TIMES as likely to be overweight than the slower eaters.  Also, according to a book read in the YouTube video below, "over 90% of fat people eat too fast."  Now that I know that eating fast is bad for your health and can lead to obesity, I will try to slow down at my meals!  Will you guys too?  

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nUo-LSsiysw

eatingtoofast.jpg

6 Comments

Hey Megan.Actually there was a fanciful dietary movement happened in the history which basically preached citizens to be a moderate eater,specifically in the pace and manner of food intake.
Fletcherism,which was coined based on the feat of an eminent American health food enthusiast(not with a title of a scientist,umm).The primary point of this seemingly philosophical idea is on the other hand pretty simple:it is far more salubrious to consume food bite by bite in a way munching them thoroughly as to both take the maximum nutrients contained in the foods and reduce the harm of gluttony.He said,"Nature will castigate those who don't masticate"I hope you get this quasi-joke,though not so legit.But it rounds up as not a joke at all.I am a slow-tempo eater,taking foods seriosuly unless I have something to rush.One of the good way to decrease your speed of eating is to control your amplitude of limbic movements,by this I mean if one doesn't swing or thrash hands all around,he/she generally will be a mannered eater rather than a voracious carnivore.(veggies are not to meant to be tackled fast,are they,girls?)I enjoyed this article and thanks for helping me remember Horace Fletcher.

Hey Megan.Actually there was a fanciful dietary movement happened in the history which basically preached citizens to be a moderate eater,specifically in the pace and manner of food intake.
Fletcherism,which was coined based on the feat of an eminent American health food enthusiast(not with a title of a scientist,umm).The primary point of this seemingly philosophical idea is on the other hand pretty simple:it is far more salubrious to consume food bite by bite in a way munching them thoroughly as to both take the maximum nutrients contained in the foods and reduce the harm of gluttony.He said,"Nature will castigate those who don't masticate"I hope you get this quasi-joke,though not so legit.But it rounds up as not a joke at all.I am a slow-tempo eater,taking foods seriosuly unless I have something to rush.One of the good way to decrease your speed of eating is to control your amplitude of limbic movements,by this I mean if one doesn't swing or thrash hands all around,he/she generally will be a mannered eater rather than a voracious carnivore.(veggies are not to meant to be tackled fast,are they,girls?)I enjoyed this article and thanks for helping me remember Horace Fletcher.

I thought this was a really interesting blog post, especially because I'm a freshman and lately have been exploring ways to avoid the dreaded freshman 15. I know I eat too quickly, but I'm generally pretty good at stopping when I know I'm full. But I think for college students, a big factor is multitasking. I know the other night I stayed up late to study for a psych exam and I had a can of pringles next to me- next thing I knew, they were gone. I would never sit down and eat an entire can of pringles if that's all I were doing. But I was focused on studying (and facebook and people watching) so I ate a large amount without even realizing it. I've learned in my short amount of time at college that another good way to avoid overeating is to pour things into bowls or cups instead of eating right out of the container. If I sit with a bag of goldfish, for instance, I'll eat the entire thing. But I've started pouring the snacks into bowls so that I don't even notice when it's gone if I'm studying, watching TV, or whatever. But I think the points you brought up in your post are really important for us freshmen and college students overall- if we slow down and try to enjoy what we're eating, weight gain shouldn't be as much of a problem.

This article is very interesting and really made me think about my eating habits again. Similar to you, my parents also used to ride me constantly about how fast I used to eat meals. And now that I think about it, it does seem that heavier people do in fact eat a lot faster then everyone else. I for one will absolutely consider slowing down eating my meals for now on. For me personally, eating can be addictive just like other substances that people get addicted to. The only way to eat slower is to keep working on it until the habit goes away eventually. One question that came up to me is about the type of food that people eat fast. If I were to eat a very healthy meal extremely fast, would I be getting better results then if I were to eat it slow? I could not find anything to answer this but would love to know.

I also found this article interesting. It legt me with this question: if eating fastly can lead to over-eating and weight gain, does eating slowly do anything for weight loss?

Personally, when I eat slowly I eat much more. It used to be a weekend routine for my family to go to hotel brunches and spend 3 hours there eating and drinking freely. For me, eating slowly and picking at all the best stuff meant I constantly had room for more and never reached that "too full" point. I would eat tons! At the dining hall as well, a slow pace for me means I usually stretch the meal out and go back for more. Eating fast and to my "full point" gives me a definitive stop point.

I thought this was interesting, especially the idea that the fast-paced lifestyle we lead could be negatively affecting our weight. However, it's interesting that most diets don't emphasize eating slower as one of the main components of weight loss. One of the earlier comments about eating more by eating slowly seems to contradict that, but I also think it's important to consider what we're putting into our bodies. Perhaps the problem in that situation is mistaking hunger for dehydration. That could contribute to why we can eat slowly but continue eating without feeling full. Many people suggest waiting 20 minutes before getting seconds to allow your body to register that it's full, and I think this is a great change we can all implement in order to lead a healthier lifestyle. This blog really made me reexamine my eating habits. Even by doing something as simple as changing what hand you hold your fork with, you can slow your eating pace which is definitely something I'll try!

Leave a comment

Subscribe to receive notifications of follow up comments via email.
We are processing your request. If you don't see any confirmation within 30 seconds, please reload your page.

Search This Blog

Full Text  Tag

Recent Entries

Alcohol and Energy Drinks
We've all heard of Four Lokos (or "blackout in a can") and the drama surrounding them when they first came…
It isn't up to the Keratin
Many girls who have naturally curly, wavy, or frizzy hair have started looking into getting keratin treatments at their local…
It isn't up to the Keratin
Many girls who have naturally curly, wavy, or frizzy hair have started looking into getting keratin treatments at their local…

Old Contributions