Pins and Needles


| 5 Comments
When I was little, I would lay on the couch and watch TV in the same position every time; I would always sit on top of my leg and lay on my side.

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After a while though, my foot would get tingly, and then my leg would get tingly until I had to stand up and shake my leg around to get the "pins and needles" feelings to go away.

What is the "pins and needles" effect? We've all had it at some point, but what is it and what causes it?

It is actually called paresthesia, and it occurs when there is sustained pressure placed on a nerve. When the pressure is released, the tingling sensation fades, obviously. This usually happens when you are staying in the same position for a while, such as in school, at work, or, like me, by watching TV.

Even though most of us have dealt with it temporarily, there is such a thing as chronic paresthesia, which is caused by :"an underlying neurological disease or traumatic nerve damage", including injuries/tumors on the spinal cord. You can also experience this if you have diabetes.

Now that I know what it is, that doesn't make it that much easier to get rid of it. Even now, my foot is tingling and I'm hopping around trying to get it to stop. (My roommate must think I'm crazy...) 

Moral of the story: get up and move around every now and then!

5 Comments

The same thing would happen to me whenever I would lay in the same position for too long. It even happens to me now. Sometimes when I wake up before class my hands have the "pins and needles" feeling because I typically sleep with my hands underneath my pillow. The longer you keep the pressure on the area of your body, the longer it takes for you to shake out the feeling or make the tingling go away. When I was younger, I would actually get scared that the tingling would not go away at all.

But what happens if you don't move around every now and then? What if you consciously lie in the same place with the tingling sensation occurring. Will the tingling go away on it's own? If you let this go on for too long, will that area of your body begin to ache or be damaged? What do you think?

I used to get scared when I was younger that it wouldn't go away - if the pain doesn't go away, you could have a pinched nerve, or it could be something more serious, like having something to do with your brain.

I hate the feeling when my feet fall asleep. I’ve never looked into what’s causing it, though, until just now! This article on MSNBC’s website explain that the intensely uncomfortable tingling feeling is actually a good thing. If we stayed in the same positions for too long, we could suffer permanent. Dr. Daroff of Case Western explains, “when sustained pressure is exerted on a portion of your leg, or any distal limb, one of two things usually happens. In some cases, arteries can become compressed, making them unable to supply local tissues and nerve cells with the nutrients (mainly oxygen and glucose) they need to function properly. Other times, nerve pathways can become blocked, preventing normal transmission of electrochemical impulses to the brain. Some of the nerves, starved or pinched or both, stop firing while others fire hyperactively. This leads to mixed signals being sent to the brain, where they are interpreted as burning, prickling or tingling feelings. It is these sensations, known medically as paresthesia, that alert you to move your foot.” Dr. Daroff also says that the pins and needs feeling can continue and/or feel more intense until there is enough movement to replenish the missing nutrients to those areas.

I hate the feeling when my feet fall asleep. I’ve never looked into what’s causing it, though, until just now! This article on MSNBC’s website explain that the intensely uncomfortable tingling feeling is actually a good thing. If we stayed in the same positions for too long, we could suffer permanent. Dr. Daroff of Case Western explains, “when sustained pressure is exerted on a portion of your leg, or any distal limb, one of two things usually happens. In some cases, arteries can become compressed, making them unable to supply local tissues and nerve cells with the nutrients (mainly oxygen and glucose) they need to function properly. Other times, nerve pathways can become blocked, preventing normal transmission of electrochemical impulses to the brain. Some of the nerves, starved or pinched or both, stop firing while others fire hyperactively. This leads to mixed signals being sent to the brain, where they are interpreted as burning, prickling or tingling feelings. It is these sensations, known medically as paresthesia, that alert you to move your foot.” Dr. Daroff also says that the pins and needs feeling can continue and/or feel more intense until there is enough movement to replenish the missing nutrients to those areas.

I hate the feeling when my feet fall asleep. I’ve never looked into what’s causing it, though, until just now! This article on MSNBC’s website explain that the intensely uncomfortable tingling feeling is actually a good thing. If we stayed in the same positions for too long, we could suffer permanent. Dr. Daroff of Case Western explains, “when sustained pressure is exerted on a portion of your leg, or any distal limb, one of two things usually happens. In some cases, arteries can become compressed, making them unable to supply local tissues and nerve cells with the nutrients (mainly oxygen and glucose) they need to function properly. Other times, nerve pathways can become blocked, preventing normal transmission of electrochemical impulses to the brain. Some of the nerves, starved or pinched or both, stop firing while others fire hyperactively. This leads to mixed signals being sent to the brain, where they are interpreted as burning, prickling or tingling feelings. It is these sensations, known medically as paresthesia, that alert you to move your foot.” Dr. Daroff also says that the pins and needs feeling can continue and/or feel more intense until there is enough movement to replenish the missing nutrients to those areas.

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