Dreaming makes you smart!


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Hard to believe isn't it? I mean i always thought that dreaming makes us a little slow. We all have them days when we woke up and five seconds later could not remember what you just dreamed of. Or is it just me?

Well Scientist had studied that dreaming actually makes people a little smarter; specifically nap time dreams. Scientist found that when you take a nap in the middle of learning a new skill that you rememeber more and get a quite understanding of the skill when you wake up.

What scientist did was put 99 college students to a computer and have them try to go through a difficult virtual maze. They started at different positions everytime they came to a dead end and was told to find trees to help get through. After 90 minutes into the study half of the participants were told to go to sleep while the other half stayed awake. After a minute of sleep the participants were woke and asked about their dreams. 4 of the participants told that their dreams were connected with the maze. After giving another try on the maze those 4  participants found the trees faster than the ones who did not sleep.

Clearly dreams can be helpful. Read more on the article and experiment here at Science News for Kids 

5 Comments

One of my favorite things to do is sleep, so this is basically the greatest thing I've ever heard. I have noticed that when I take little naps in between my classes, sometimes I dream about my classes or what I did that day or what I still need to do. And I remember my dreams better than when I full on sleep. But because they only let the participants sleep for one minute, I'm wondering if this only works when you take short naps. If you take a nap that's an hour or two long, does it have the same effect?

Sleep is absolutely essential to learning. This is not a recent finding by any means. In this article from Harvard scholars, we see the connections between sleep and memory. Declarative memory is the kind of memory that is “what” we know. Procedural memory is “what we know how to do.” Both are really important for solidifying new knowledge and to help learning. The scholars say, “When we are sleep deprived, our focus, attention, and vigilance drift, making it more difficult to receive information. Without adequate sleep and rest, over-worked neurons can no longer function to coordinate information properly, and we lose our ability to access previously learned information” (“Sleep, Learning, and Memory”). This is probably why we are always told to sleep before a big exam and not cram, since we want the information to be encoded and remembered.

I can't even begin to tell you how many times I've woken up from a dream and 5 minutes later I can't even remember what it was. It frustrates me so much. One thing I heard though is that every night we have a dream or multiple dreams. We just never seem to remember them when we wake up. Even when we wake up thinking we didn't dream that night, we did. We just instantly can't remember what it was. This seems impossible to me, but seems like another interesting topic similar to this one to think about for maybe a future blog post.

Sleep is the period when the brain recharges. The learning aspect reminds me of saving your progress in a video game, locking in the data to come back to later. Without recharging the brain by not sleeping, you are more inclined to fall asleep when you are supposed to be paying attention, and more likely to forget things.

As for remembering dreams, the only ones I can really remember were the really realistic ones or the recurring ones. If they were really weird and outlandish, unless I actively think about it in the morning, I forget all about it. I usually mostly imagine total darkness and silence, though, so I can't say that I remember dreaming every night.

Sleep is the period when the brain recharges. The learning aspect reminds me of saving your progress in a video game, locking in the data to come back to later. Without recharging the brain by not sleeping, you are more inclined to fall asleep when you are supposed to be paying attention, and more likely to forget things.

As for remembering dreams, the only ones I can really remember were the really realistic ones or the recurring ones. If they were really weird and outlandish, unless I actively think about it in the morning, I forget all about it. I usually mostly imagine total darkness and silence, though, so I can't say that I remember dreaming every night.

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